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Full text of "Pilgrim"



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Pilgrim Staff 1949-1950 

Editor-in-Chief Shirley Knight 

Asst. Editors Jane Hilton, Marilyn Griffith 

Business Manager Anne Hathaway 

Staff Dorothy Chase, Ann Hilton, Howard Penn, David 

Pyle, Suzanne Sharkey, Barbara Brenner, Patricia 
Darsch, Ann English 

Art Editor Lorraine Monti 

Staff Peggy Wood, Richard Blaisdell, Frances Davis 

Candid Camera Beverly Carton 

Staff Franklin Bassett, Joan Borgatti, Anne Drew 

School News Editor Edward Smith 

Asst Jeanette Doten 

Boys' Sports Editor Richard Weaver 

Staff Wayne Terry, Donald Jesse, Raynor Taylor 

Girl's Sports Editor Jacqueline Boyer 

Asst Nancy Merritt, Jacqueline Smith 

Senior Features Maryellen Gault 

Staff Audrey Fowler, Judith Jackson, Arthur Morton, 

Adelaide Souza, Cassandra Wood 

Senior Quatrains Louise Gavoni 

Staff Diamantina Rego, Florence Silva, Charles Zahn 

French Editor Sylvia Corsini 

Asst Priscilla Johnson, Constance Crowell 

Latin Editor Jane Clough 

Asst Carol White 

Science-Math Editor Paul Zaniboni 

Asst Mansell Crowell 

Typists Richard Darsch, Frances Smith 

Distribution Neilia Halunen, Patricia Parkhurst 

EXECUTIVE BOARD 

Shirley Knight Louise Gavoni 

Jane Hilton Anne Hathaway 

Jacqueline Boyer Lorraine Monti 

Beverly Carton Howard Penn 

Jane Clough Edward Smith 

Sylvia Corsini Richard Weaver 

Maryellen Gault Paul Zaniboni 



Senior Silhouettes 




Richard Darsch 

In our sophomore and senior years, we chose as president of our class 
a most sociable and ambitious leader. Ever willing to co-operate in any 
activity, Dickie led us through the two most difficult years of our school 
career with great success. He has been an active member of the Pilgrim 
Staff and the S.A.S., and a bank teller, for three years. In his junior year, 
he received the honor of attending the 1949 Massachusetts Boys' State. 
The Class of 1950 is proud to have such an able leader among its members. 



Glenn McNeil 

What, you can't see him? Oh, here he is, our handsome six-footer! An 
active member of the Class of 1950, Glenn has won fame in many phases 
of his high school career. He has been vice-president of our class for the 
past two years; a member of the S.A.S., band, and orchestra; and a col- 
lector for the C.M.C. He has also won renown as an ardent sportster, 
playing a very important role in football, basketball, track, and baseball. 
Glenn will long be remembered for his participation in our many school 
activities. 





Shirley Knight 

Few have acquitted themselves as well in their studies and in literary 
activities as she; and few have achieved the popularity of our Shirley. 
With her unlimited energy and cheerfulness, she has been an inspiration 
to all. As a member of the S.A.S. for two years and its vice-president 
during her junior year; editor-in-chief of the Pilgrim; a member of both 
the National Honor Society and the Honor Group; an active participant 
in the glee club; a member of the library staff; and a representative to the 
1949 Massachusetts Girls' State, Shirley contributed to making herself one 
of the most esteemed members of her class. 



Howard Penn 

As treasurer of our class since our sophomore year, Howie has suc- 
ceeded in maneuvering one of the most financially embarrassed classes in 
history through an intricate maze of economy measures. He has contrib- 
uted much to the cheerfulness and good will of our school. He has been 
a member of the track team and of the business staff of the Pilgrim for 
three years, and in his junior year was manager of the football team and 
a member of the dramatic club. 




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Excelsior, that cry of old , 
That battle cry of warrior bold, 

Still has a meaning, true and clear, 
For those who wish to peuse ana near. 

Excelsior, rise ever higher - 

Onward, upward,feed the fire 
Of our hopes, life is beginning; 
Success is ours, just for the winning. 

Never falter, set the goal 

Evernigher, trumpets roll 
Inspiring notes our hearts to lift. 

The worlds ours, we have the gift 
Of youth; the futures shining bright, 

A challenge , and its worth the fight 

loknow were Lvma in a land 

Where we are fiee , and we can stand 
And feel a surmng sense of pride 

And know that we'll not be denied. 
A chance to work and make our way, 

AndWv that with earn passing day 
oome things we want will he attained, 

Some lessons leamed,some insights gained^ 
That we may practice what is riant 

And live heneath Gods loving light. 
Nancy Raymond 



A 







ROBERT ALBERTINI 

Bobby lugs and Bobby 

plows. 
And does he throw that line! 
And when he gets that 

touchdown, 
Then everything is fine. 





- CAROLINE ALMEIDA 

Carrie is a pcetty girl J 
With peaches and cream 

complexion; 
We think that she is one 

swell kid, 
The object of our affection. 



i 









JOHN ANDREWS 

Johnnie Andrews is our man, 
He really slings that ball; 
In basketball and football too 
We think he tops them all. 



JOAN ASKINS 

If you have e'er concluded 
That she is always shy, 
Just say to her, "Hi, Joan- 

nie"— 
There'll be diamonds in her 

eye. 




DORINNE AUSMAN 

With swiftness and alertness 
She dribbles down the floor; 
Dorinne has made a basket 
And we all shout for more. 



She never has been guilty 

Of talking out of turn; 

To anyone it's obvious 
She comes to 






ENE BAKER 



In the movies, on the street, 
Never a lonesome gal, 
She'll never walk a lonely 

path 
With Barbara as her pal. 



J*-#^JlJL. 




CLYDE, BALBONI 

dydie drives his father^ ' 
truckj -^~~- +^fijf\ A^ 

A bakerls son *ls he; 

Delivering bread and cakes 
and rolls, I V 

A baker he will be *- ±Ju\ 



-> 







GERALD BASTONI 



When period II mechanics 

comes, 
Gerry's at his best; 
He writes, and writes, and 

writes, and writes, 
And outdoes all the rest. 



LELITA BASTOS 

Whenever a question rises, 
She has what it takes, 
As the class of 1950s 
Master of debates. 










a 



OlA 



WJxt 




HAROLD BEAL 

Harold has a little car; 
It always can be seen; 
But there's no need to 

wonder why 
Because it's painted green! 



ANNETTE BEAULIEU 

You've heard the simile 
"As neat as a pin"; 
Any contest for neatness, 
Annette would win. 



RICHARD BENASSI 

Ben's the man in football 
Who seems to know his stuff; 
But when he gets to house- 
hold arts, 
That's something really 
tough." 



RAYMOND BESEGAI 

A terror on the football field, 
He really knocks them dizzy; 
And nobody can compare 

with our 
Jet-propelled Besi! 




habits favorite 



And^PI-H.jSj we know, 
Could p9Jflr get ^8oi»g v 

out 
That famous lad, Bo-Bo. 



MANDO BORGATTI 

Ted Williams is his hero; 
He really knows his "stuff" 
He hopes to be just like 

him 
If he is good enough. 




oV 



JOSEPHINE BORGHESANI 

v - 
Always cheerful, 
Always, gay — 
Whatever makes you 
Stay that way? ^ 





EDWIN BORSARI 

The world has its Einstein 
With whom we can't com- 
pete; 
But we have a scientist 
That's very hard to beat. 

&* ■ 



JACQUELINE BOYER 

She's a pretty cheerleader 
With energy and zest; 
And in the class of '50, 
She is the wittiest^ 




*># 





AUGUST BRENNER 

Oogie is a schoolwide scream 
In household arts and gym; 
But boy, does Oogie calm 

right down 
When Coach gets hold of 

him. 









Tin^e 



, 



jp^4 



RICHARD BURGESS 

Dickie dribbles, then he 
shoots, 

Unrivaled in his pace; 

And when the baseball sea- 
son's here, 

We'll find him on first base. 



DAVID CALHOUN 

We need but look at David 
To see that he could be 
Of service to a football 

team; 
He was, quite naturally! 




Sweden had its Gunder 
Haag, 

And we have our Gil Dodds; 

But Plymouth's at its boast- 
ing best 

When o'er the line Jim plods. 



BEVERLY CARTON 

She always does her work 

well, 
We never hear her fuss; 
She has not only intellec, 
But personality-plus. ^ t > 



ect 



She's gentle of speech 
And quiet of mien, 
With as friendly a smile 
As ever we've seen. 









- 






C A HI IN CAVICCHI 



She may have a tiny voice, 
On this we must agree; 
But Carlyn has the biggest 

heart 
The school will ever see. 



^ 



\ 



JP RUfH CHASE 

Ruthie'd - like to be a nurse; 
It J9 her hoye -and prayer; 
We know shi'H heed the pa- 
tients' cajls j 
And give them all her care. 



JANE CLOUGH 

Janie is Miss Wilber's pet, 
And one of the braver souls 

is she 
Who dared to explore in 

Virgil's verse 
Beyond the pains of Latin 

III. 



ALICE COLPITIS 

What can we say of Alice? 
She's small and rather shy; 
She'll' greet us smiling gayly, 
Whenever passing by. 




ELLEN COLPITIS 

Ellen has a merry laugh, 
A rather funny giggle; 
And if we tell a funny joke, 
She will start to wiggle. 













GLORIA CORREA 

In fair or stormy weather, 
It matters not a bit, 
Gloria's hair is curly — 
How we envy it! 



" Neither saint nor sinner, 
Neither^age nor; dunce 
We know ihatfy'ou would 

UkJJkirtf^ZZX- 

If you should meet him once. 



SYLVIA CORSINI 

Excelsior or je-vais bien — 

To her, it's plain to see, 
Sayings in French and Latin 
Come easy as can be. 



RICHARD DARSCH 

We thinks that Picks among 

the ^jy^irAV^ 

His years^have been well 

spent^/ *f ^Las~CX-> 
And never will there be a. ' 

lad Jdj^a^&^fiAJ^ 
Like our class president H 



I ■ • 



CLARE DONOVAN 

Clare will run a kinder- 
garten, 

Teach the children A B C's, 

Teach them how to read and 
write 

With the greatest skill and 
ease. 










RANDALL DOUGLAS 

jRandy runs, and runs, and 

runs 
For Mister Guidaboni; 
When Sadie Hawkins day 

comes 'round, 
He may be rather lonely. 



COTTI 

A ^wizard ar tnaking figures 
In joqpnal or general 

ledger^* ^> /") 

Having such-ja bookkeeper 
^boss a i>leas- 




WILFRED DOYON 

A^gentleman and student, 

A combination fair; 

His manner^ »most cGhsider 

ate, 
His inner humor, rare. 




'9 




i 




1 



WILLIAM DREW 



Billy often has those, days 
When everything goes 

wrongs i-AJ 
But he just lets them fly 

right by 
As if they were 



ALAN ESTES 

Alan is a regular guy; 

There's no one that is 
keener; 

And, here in school, through- 
out the halls, 

He's known as "locker- 




f 





GERALDINE 



Your coal-black hair 
In graceful swirls 
Is quite the envy 
Of all the girls. 



It really doesn't matter 
Whether it's Gable or Jean, 
At every change of picture 
Geneva can be seen. 




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• 




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FRANK DUTHIE 

Duthie is £ quiet lad, fi 
Who nevei", says/e WP r ^o 
But when .he/s^hr thfe^htysi 

class. 
That's when he can be 

heard. 



sics 



> 






ANNE DYKEMAN 

If you don't know this pleas- 
ant girl, 
You needn't gaze and stare — 
Just look for C. Cavicchi 
And you will see her there. 



ANN ENGLISH 

Sweetness of manner 
And keenness of mind 
Seldom are found 
So nicely combined. 



RIOLI 



He's handsome, wise, and 

witty 
Wherever he may go; 
Moreover, it's our Ralphie. 
Who is the ladies' beau. 



ALMA FERNANDEZ 

Alma's always quiet, 
As quiet as can be — 
Silence must be golden 
As we can plainly see. 




CHARLES FILLEBROWN 



Chickie's small, but he is 

swell; 
He's liked by all in school; 
"Love your neighbor as 

yourself' 
Is his daily rule. 




• * 





10 





JOAN F1TZPATRICK 

She gave her voice in har- 
mony; 

She always played her part; 

And in the operetta, 

"Mark" took "Birdie's" 
heart. 




Her attitude's 

Commendable, 

At work or play — 

Dependable. 




DOLORES FONTES 



Nice things come in small 

bundles; 
On this we must agree; 
Though less than five feet 

tall, 
A swell little gal is she. 




LOUISE GAVONI 



She's captain of our cheer- 
ing squad, 
This pretty, talented lass; 
She's also best girl citizen, 
Most brilliant of our class. 




ROY FORNACIARI 

Abraham's a regular guy, 
Who always does his share; 
And always after dances, 
We find him cleaning there. 



RITA GAVONI 

How does she get her work 

done? 
The answer we would find; 
For every minute of the day, 
It's Johnny on her mind. 




AUDREY FOWLER 

Whatever knowledge 
Can be gained from a book 
She seeks for herself 
In some quiet nook. 



' 



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ZZ + 




P~~ 



JAMES GARSD3E 

Your funny antics make us 

laugh 
We wonder what we'll do 
When we go out into this 

world 
Without a clown like you. 



MARY GD3BS 

A gentle answer 
And winning smile 
Make moments with her 
Worth our while. 



CORA GLASS 

In want of a typist? 
We need not go far; 
In that special field 
Miss Glass is a star. 




11 




BEVERLY GONSALVES 

Quiet, yet resourceful, 
Throughout the livelong day; 
Nothing causes worry — 
She says it doesn't pay. 




40 



V J LILLIAN JlANELT 

Lilhan Jcan't irown \&>r long, 
No mwterxhjrw shAj tries; 
For i^uchUshe wHnkles up 
her brow;\ \ V 




ROBERT GORDO] 




sitfT#H 



There's la 



fean't be beat; 
game of football he can 
Play $W$T 

That really is a treat. 



ANNE HATHAWAY 



. S. After leaving high school 





ALFRED GOVONI 



Ally has a change of girl 

Every other day. 

"I'll love them and I'll leave 

them" — 
This he'll always say. 




ELIZABETH GOVONI 

Her temper's roused 
Her face grows red — 
For, "Hi there, Liz," 
Someone just said. 




CHARLES HADAWAY 

You'll find Charlie on a boat; 
He's always on the sea; 
Lobsters are his only love — 
A lobsterman he'll be. 



To college she will go, 
To study and to learn 
What a scientist should 
knew. 




ASHLEY HOLMES 



If the day is sunny 
Or if there's rain or snow, 
He will take his pop-gun, 
And a-hunting he will go. 




SARAH HOLMES 

In every class that she at- 
tends 

Her voice we cannot hear; 

"Will you please repeat, Miss 
Holmes; 

It's much too soft, we fear." 




A 



BARBARA HOWE 

WJt6 is this girl you speak jof 

now?;' \> y 

BarbaraV-is that her name? 
We hardly hear from her at 

all; V 

We hope we're not to blame. 





/ / 



12 



> 



' 





ft 




JUDITH JACKSON 

Cool, calm, and collected 
Judy will always be; 
Never will she worry — 
This is plain to see. 



Sfr ^/^^/^W 



' 



MARY LEMING 



We could speak no ill of her 
Even if we would; 
Always she conducts herself 
As a lady should. 




RUDOLPH JOKINEN 



A 



Rudy is the quietest boy 
That's in our senior class; 
We wonder if he'll ever want 
The company of a lass. 



* ELIZABETH LOPRESTI 

Time and money she will 

save 
As the years go by; 
Her naturally curly hair 
Is the reason why. 






SETH KALLIO 

"The president of the S. A. S. 
Is "smart" as he can be; 
And with our best girl cit- 
izen 
He travelled to D. C. 




SHIRLEY KNIGHT 

She's the Pilgrim's editor 
And secretary of our class; 
She wants to be a teacher, 
This earnest, active lass. 



ELAINE LOVELL 

Some find her sad and ser- 
ious; 

Some say she's gay, amus- 
ing— 

A dual personality 

Can be a bit confusing. 




RONALD KANE 

We always see him talking; 
We'd never think him shy; 
But faster beats his heart 
When a pretty girl goes by. 



PATRICIA LOVETT 

Patty is a wonderful girl; 
She is so sweet and kind; 
This is the type of girl we 

like, 
Yet who's so hard to find. 



DOROTHY MacDONALD 

Both sweet and charming, 
She's the one 
Whose golden silence 
Gets things done. 




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■ 



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13 




JEANETTE MacNAB 

She uses pencil, pen, and 

brush 
With such apparent ease; 
We know before her work is 

done 
Results are sure to please. 



■4** 




SSr 



- -J~rt<> 



GEORGE MARTIN 

We hear the band rehearsing 
And hesitate to hum — 
The little man most rhyth- 
mic 
Is our Marty on the drum. 





BARBARA McMAHON 

Quiet and unassuming, 
Friendly without guile, 
She demonstrates the value 
Of a fascinating smile. 






JANE McMANUS 



We must give credit 
Where credit is due; 
Dispositions like her's 
Are notably few. 



rcrvr 



** 



rs 



JANET McMANUS 

In trans, and office practice 
She's always at her best; 
When Mrs. Gardner calls 

her 
She far excels the rest. 



GLENN McNEIL 

A flash of our own blue and 

white 
Across the floor and back, 
A daring run, a perfect shot, 
Two more points for "Mac". 





JANET MEEHAN 

Janet and Mary 
Are together each day 
Whether at work 
Or whether at play. 



7 



NANCY MELISSE 

As you go down the corridor 
If you see some golden hair 
And hear a little giggle, 
You'll know that Nancy's 
there. 



BARBARA MENTZEL 

Barby wants to be a nurse, 
We've been often told; 
If you're ever feeling ill, 
Give her your hand to hold. 



V\ • 



NANCY M ERR ITT 

^* f r" V 

Though vre'^e come to 'think 

of Carver as the 
Cranberry's special realm, 
We'll find tftis lass in ecstacy 

when 
Baseball takes the helm. 




^ r 



14 








ALLAN MINELLI 

Al hopes to join the Navy 
And sail across the foam; 
But he will miss his auto, 
'Cause in it he's right at 



home. 



/i .y* ' ■ 



ARTHUR MORTON 

P. H. S. will never have 
A drummer such as he; 
And at every football game 
He "boomed" to victory. 




LORRAINE 



'J* '^rf 






MONTI 

Printing, drawing, or paint- 
ing, 

She's tops in the field of art; 

Whenever the school needs 
her help, 

She's willing to do her part. 







BEVERLY NORTHRU 



Writing notes in study hall 
Is Northrup's specialty; 
She'll pass one anytime 3he 

thinks 
The teacher cannot see. 








7 



VILMA' MONTI 

The "Ticker" had an artist 
Who unsurpassed will be, 
When all the world discovers 
Who' drew our "Timothy". 




^ 



/■ 



EL OWENS ; 

is the wdmanly art 
Is today don't know 
is the living proof 
just iii't fa.. 



ALVIN MOREY 

His friends all call him by 

the names 
Of "Big Al" and "Big 

Husky" — 
He's seen out on his paper 

route 
On days both bright and 

dusky. 





f K 




She takes Home many books 
To study* every night; 
H6r aim is to acquire 
A knowledge that is right. 



PARKER 

i 

Sweetheart, or 





make 
plexion 
Glow so radiantly? 










■. I 






15 




JV . 






Q°* J 




JOHN PATR1CO 

Jack's a very lovable guy, 
A very handsome man; 
The girls all think he's 

wonderful. 
Even Mrs. Urann. 



yJ^VlOMH!. PINTO 

':he« 

s ; V 



:rlHg thejBroys v to victory 
's^ravor^te 
-to, raise 
re /to do )1 



ieerlB„ 
IsjjvfcleVs/'ravorlte art/* 
T& htlp'-to, raise the score, 
She'&AthW /to ' 



her part. 




Gen 

We haye^often^ heatfd; 
This asse) 
For Gi 1 



inpEipr 





PATRICIA POTTER 

q^u^y sh£*s ^nble, 

a .dancer, who has flair; 

'II rise to sjtar- 



HOWARD PENN 

Howie is the class' clown, 
His actions are so funny; 
But as the treasurer of our 

class 
He's a genius with our 

money. 




JOSEPH PINTO 

We know that Joe c&h 
play-_^ tt^' 

His music's so aifrancing; 

When he takfes^up his clar 
inet, \ 

All P. H. S. starts dancing. 



Really 




DALTON PRATT 

Dalton's noted for two 

things: 
Pitching balls is one; 
The other's drawing cute 

cartoons — 
No sooner said than done. 





— . 



RETONI 



Marilyn's always smiling, 
"he's always bright and gay; 
he brings a ray of sunshine 
Jnto ogr darkest day. 




A i 



LINWOOD RAYMOND 

Linnie's fast and nimble 
When dribbling down the 

floor, 
And when be makes those 

baskets. 
Way up goes the score. 




16 



• ' 




u^ 



^^ 



NANCY RAYMOND 

Photogenically 
She rates high — 
Proofs from Purdy 
Do not lie. 




% 











ELEANOR RUEDIGER 

Bouncing down the corri- 
dors, 
Hustling to class, 
Miss Ruediger is late again 
So please let her pass. 



DIAMANTINA REGO 

In school news ©very Mon- 
day night t^^ 
The typing work is fine; 
She ean'x be beat in any 

K>OTK, 

No matter in what line. 



THOMAS ST GEORGE 

That Tommy is a quiet boy 
Is far beyond believing; 
Though he often looks that 

way, 
His appearance is deceiving. 






that foot- 
s "share to win. 



/ She avoids much trouble 
• Because she holds her 
tongue; 
In' quiet wqrds and simple. 
Her praises' should be sung. 













NANCY ROMANO 



We bet she slfrps her cereal 
Just to do vher hair; .^ 
Such a beautiful coiffure 
Must take hourt to prepare 



" 




J" 






LEON SCAGLIARINI 

Skully has a way with 

girls— 
They think that he is "cute"; 
But he just shoos them all 

away, 
He doesn't give a "hoot". 




^ 







HELEN SHWOM 

Helen is a charming girl, 
Tp us she's very dear. 
What Poland lost, we have 

§£U.lT©Cf~~ v 

We're glad to have her here. 




17 



■ 

■ ■ ■ 



^ !'..•>-'. 



1 ,v- 



■ 



H 



M * v i 






Miss Kelly is wondering 
Just what she'll do; '' 
Will she find a banlr telfer 
As faithful, as ybu? 






thirs// fo^ ^rgu- 

? * Sl«e^he / seisJr 
No mj(tt$ 1 lMiat th^jjuestion 

Frances / disagr 



f Mr 




GEORGIANA SILV/ 

This girl in garments neat 

and trim, 
Is fitted to a "T", 
Well-prepared for jobs 

ahead, 
Whatever they* may be. 



..,- 




A, 



LEONORA SILVA 

To know her is to like her— 
Her sense of humor's kee/i 
She's orte of the happiest 

persons 
That we have ever seen. 







f"™ sn 

~tf we go. into 



wel 



ing/tf 
A -pretty 

akinfl ch' 

slips- 
Shys busy /as a bee 



Clot: 

, _ ll/see 
e and signing 



f I 




EDWARD SMITH 

You haven't lived until 

you've heard 
Our Perry Como sing, 
For girls think Eddie can't 

be beat 
By Sinatra, Haymes, or Bing. 




ADELAIDE SOUZA 

She appeared in the school 

operetta, 
Her voice had made her a 

star 

As Marjorie, Belle of the 

Campus — 
Her voice will take her far. 

LILLIAN SOUZA 

Although she's rather tiny, 
In this we all agree-^- 
That Lilly has a knadk for ^ 
Being funny as can Jte. i\ 





ever go to Plympton 
breathe thj© country air, I 
Laokrup and down the main 

street^-- [yV \Juir 
You'll find sweet Carol Afaere. 

J- Mr 



RAYMOND STRINGER 

Raymond loves his baseball — 
It is his pride and joy; 
He resembles Dom DiMaggio 
In being a quiet boy. 




m^Mk 



18 







(ThjL 







ALBION STURGIS 

Reputed as a swimming star, 
This lad may prove to be 
Another Johnny Weismuller 
For movie fans to see. 





EDWARD TRAVERS 

Eddie is a handsome lad, 
Who plays a clarinet; 
And if he keeps on practic- 
ing 
He'll rise to stardom yet. 




BARBARA STLVA 

Though Barbara was the 
pride and joy 

Of the drivers' training class. 

When she asked for home- 
work papers, 

"Did we have some?" asks 
this lass. 



CAROLE TASSINARI 

Carole has a heartthrob — 
Couldj George be his name? 
Still, her mind can think 

straight 
Although her heart's aflame. 



BARBARA TURINI 

There's sure to be some fun 
Wherever she may be; 
But be careful of her 

temper — 
It's just like T.N.T.! 



J 



3 




OAN VANDINI 







'- 






RICHARD TASSINARI 

Tassa dribbles and Tassa 

shoots 
And Tassa makes a score; 
The crowd is cheering all 

the time — 
He's terrific on that floor! 






I VfrS~ "!V^ 

This pretty girl with spark- 
ling eyes 

Is always full of pep; 

She is a good example of 

The girls who shout, "Hep, 
Hep!" 



JFdANIEV VERM? 
N^wondeV Bat,we^rs SjfS <r 




r wonc 
J mufch/greeYi ^ ^JV*^ 

IjAnd^wearsian Irjs+r' sfpile — 
It's <eause &$ is "a ^ttmnch 

son of 
The good jdld Emeffcld Isle. 



W 







WAYNE TERRY 


RICHARD WEAVER 


* 


Terry is the fitting "cap" 


Rick was the bravest boy 


% -- 


Of Mr. Guidaboni's team; 


Who ever dared to be 


- 


And when he dashes on 


The only boy amidst five 


A 


ahead, 


girls 


4)^B 


He's really on the beam! 


In Miss Jacques' class, 


^k 




French III. 


k } 







I • 



■ I 



■ 



; ' 



JC 



19 





JEANETTE WHITELEY 

Jeanette's an accurate ty- 
pist, 

This is plain to see; 

For Standish Motors Com- 
pany 

She works on vigorously. 




PEGGY WOOD 

She takes her art with Mrs. 
Brown; 

She draws, she prints, she 
paints, 

Has perfect skills in each of 
these 

And works without com- 
plaints. 




PATRICIA WILLETTE 

Pat, you'll Think, is very shy 
Until you know her well; 
Then yotf'U find she's lots of 

fun, 
As all her friends can tell. 



MARCJA WILUAM& 

We take pride^fn having 
A queen within our class; 
Two years ago sbe won the 

crown — </¥l^ 
The national cranberry lass. 




ALFRED WOOD 

A sign of temper 
Is red hair, 
But your outbursts 
Are so rare. 



CASSANDRA WOOD 

Smartly dressed, 
Our Sandy's gay — 
Correctly attired 
At work or at play. 



CHARLES ZAHN 

Oh Charlie is a handsome 

lad; 
But of course that isn't news; 
As the operetta's Count, 
He played the funny 

"Snooze". 

PAUL ZANBBONi 1 

J 
His gaietjis contagious; j 
He does what e'er he can 
To keep us happyat our 
tasks; ^ ^ i 

He's our good hum^Mn^n. 



RICHARD ZAND30NI 

The girls may love their six- 
foot blondes, 

Those fair-haired men, and 
yet, 

The red-haired ones can't 
even compete 

With a handsome, tall bru- 
nette. 






20 



The Principal Speaks 




Not every man has clearly 
earned the right to speak his 
mind as has the young man whose 
words appear below. What he has 
to say is so much what I would 
like to be able to say that I ask 
your indulgence in presuming to 
have him speak for me. 

Read about this man (he was- 
n't much older than you when his 
"great adventure" began); read 
what he has to say; and do what 
your conscience tells you is nec- 
essary for you. 

(The paragraphs that follow 
were clipped from the New York 
Times of March 5, 1950.) 

JOHN CROWN'S LEGACY 



Veteran Leaves an Example 

of Courage and A Plea That 

Love Supplant Greed 

By Howard A. Rusk, M.D. 

In 1946 a letter was pub- 
lished in this column from a 
young veteran in Halloran 
Hospital, a letter created by 
suffering, anguish and be- 
wilderment. Last week, after 
fours years of struggle, the writer, John Crown, died. 

His legacy to the world was an example of courage and a philosophy 
of life, which, in these troubled and uncertain days, plead even more elo- 
quently for the necessity of understanding than on the day on which his 
letter was written. 

In this era of precocious technology, hydrogen bombs, guided missiles 
and all the additions to the horrors of war that have caused an epidemic 
of anxiety and tension throughout the world, this pain-wracked boy's 
prescription for peace among men merits thoughtful re-reading. 

***** 

My name is John Crown. I am a paraplegic at Halloran General Hos- 
pital. My physical wounds are very small in comparison with my spiritual 
wounds. I have come back from death to a world that I no longer care 
for. I, who have been engaged in the great struggle to save the world 
from tyranny and having seen my comrades die for this cause, can now 
find no peace in the world or in my country. 

Having lived close to death for two years, the reasons why there is 
no peace seems infinitesimally flimsy. Russia wants the Dardanelles, Yugo- 
slavia wants Trieste, the Moslems want India, labor wants more wages, 
capital wants more profit, Smith wants to pass the car in front of him, 
Junior wants more spending money. To these, I say, is it necessary to 
kill and cripple human beings for these petty gains? 

Anyone who thinks a human body is so cheap that it can be traded 
for a tract of land, a piece of silver, or a few minutes of time should be 
forced to listen to the moans of the dying night and day for the rest of 
his life. 

All the troubles of the world originate in the common man. The self- 
ish and greedy ways of nations are just the ways of each individual man 
multiplied a hundredfold. When the morals of the common man drop, so 
do the morals of the nation and of the world. 

As long as our individual morals remain at a low ebb, so will be the 
world. Until each of us stops "hogging the road" with his car, stops fight- 
ing over the seat on the bus, stops arguing over who is going to cut the 
grass, there will be no peace in the world. If man wishes peace again, he 
must return to the great Commandment, "Love thy neighbor as thyself 
for the love of God." 

21 






\>> 



tea mm 



We, the class of 1950, being of sound mind after studying for three 
long years geometric theorems, French irregular verbs, and the facts of 
American history, before leaving the portals of dear old Plymouth High 
School, do hereby dispose our choicest valuables to the faculty and our 
underclassmen in our last will and testament, revoking any wills hereto- 
fore made by us: 

To Miss Jacques we leave the hope that she'll get her Joan of Arc 

bust (Ingrid Bergman??) 
To Coach Walker we leave 150 pounds of excess weight for the future 

football teams of P. H. S. 
To Miss Connolly we leave the best of everything and a new blanket 

for Tara. 
To Miss Albertini we leave a set of psychology books with which to 

analyze her students. 
To Mrs. Bagnall we leave some complete makeup kits for future oper- 
ettas. 
To Mrs. Bailey we leave a radar machine so she can detect faulty 

absentee excuses. 
To Mrs. Brown we leave the juniors to carry on. 
To Miss Downey we leave four new shades, dark ones!!! 
To Mr. Guidaboni we leave a ton of gravel and an appointment with 

the school committee. 
To Mr. Romano we leave a new toupee — (Grass doesn't grow on a 

busy street). 
To Mr. Holmes we leave a copy of the "World's Best Year Book." 
To Mr. Pacheco we leave a set of diapers. (There have been some 

changes made.) 
To Mrs. Kingman we leave one opaque curtain for the door of Room 

106. 
To Mr. Packard we leave a model boy and girl so he can explain the 

reactions of neutrons and protons. 
To Miss Locklin we leave the fourth dimension, whatever that is. 
To Miss Kelly we leave a telescope so she can keep an eye on Mr. 

Smiley (strictly business, you understand.) 
To Miss Johnson we leave the hope that future seniors won't pester 

her with questionnaires. 
To Mrs. Gardner we leave the hope that juniors will have better 

ideas for Prom colors. 
To Miss Crook we leave with envy of her sparkling personality. 
To Miss Farnsworth we leave three pairs of 54 gauge nylons and a 

new pair of 2%" heels. 
To Miss Wilber we leave a round trip ticket to Rome, all expenses 

paid by the school department, of course! 
To Mrs. Urann we leave more stray boys for her to bring home. 
To Mr. Young we leave an all-girl biology class. 
To Mr. Smiley we leave an antenna so he can receive Miss Kelly's 

messages. 
To Mrs. Raymond we leave the question, "How do you do it?" 
To Mr. Pyle we leave the hopes that American History won't always 

be compulsory. 
To Mr. Mongan, despite your misgivings, we leave. 
Robert Albertini leaves his cooking ability to Ralph Graffam. 
Caroline Almeida leaves locker No. 201 to any future senior lucky 

enough to get it. 
John Andrews leaves for Florida. 
Joan Askins leaves her quiet second table in 5th period study to any 

unlucky kids who want it. 
Dorinne Ausman leaves her title as best girl athlete to any junior 

wjio can measure up to it. 



22 



Elizabeth Baker leaves her locker space on the third floor to anyone 

who wants to get hit on the head. 
Irene Baker leaves all her stationery and stamps to B. S., who has 

two studies a day and nothing to do. 
Clyde Balboni leaves all his school worries to anyone who wants them. 
Gerald Bastoni leaves his punctuation sheets to the next up-and- 
coming senior. 
Lelita Bastos leaves her seat in period 1 study to any junior girl. 
Harold Beal leaves . . . with pleasure. 

Annette Beaulieu leaves her Oregon Trail to some lucky junior. 
Richard Benassi leaves — wait! if he can leave! 
Raymond Besegai just plain leaves. 
Roland Bolduc leaves the Zizzle gang for any junior who wants to 

join. 
Mando Borgatti leaves one locker and one vacant seat to the unknown 

senior. 
Joyce Borghesani leaves the radiator outside Room 301 to some junior. 
Edwin Borsari leaves Mrs. Urann for future generations. 
Jackie Boyer leaves her tired tonsils to a quiet junior. 
August Brenner leaves his cooking class to the girls. 
Richard Burgess leaves the baseball team a few cracked bats. 
David Calhoun leaves senior English with Mrs. Raymond to Jack 

Davidson. 
Jim Cameron leaves his track spikes to Steve Tavares in hopes that 

he will get the lead out of his pants. 
Beverly Carton leaves to her junior pals in chemistry the "joys" of 

physics next year. 
Dolores Casal leaves the nine lives of a cat to any senior graduating. 
Carlyn Cavicchi leaves the saying "If I can do it, anyone can." 
Ruth Chase leaves her World History book to anyone who will take it. 
Jane Clough leaves her Latin 4 book to any junior crazy enough to 

take it. 
Alice Colpitts leaves her history book to any junior. 
Ellen Colpitts leaves her laugh for any girl who wants it. 
Gloria Correa leaves her knowledge to any junior nuts enough to 

accept it. 
Paul Correa leaves school with two front teeth. 
Sylvia Corsini leaves her Latin 4 book to anyone deserving it. 
Hilda Costa leaves her dimples to any straight faced junior. 
Mary Cotti leaves space at graduation exercises in '51 to any junior 

with 60 points. 
Virginia Creati leaves all her belongings to the new seniors. 
Richard Darsch leaves his Zizzle membership to any junior who 

wants it. 
Geraldine DiStaula leaves her one brain to a junior needing another. 
Clare Donovan leaves the senior floor for all those unfortunate juniors 

to reside in. 
Randall Douglas leaves his track shoes to Rollene Zaniboni. 
Wilfred Doyon leaves his initials carved on his desk. 
William Drew leaves his girl until she graduates. 
Frank Duthie wills pleasant association with Mrs. Urann to Bob 

Richmond. 
Anne Dykeman leaves her books for any junior strong enough to 

carry them. 
Ann English leaves by the same door she came in. 
Alan Estes leaves his teachers to anyone who wants them. 
Geneva Fantoni leaves school and hopes she never has to return again. 
Ralph Ferioli leaves this advice to juniors: "Don't fool around in 

cooking." 
Alma Fernandez leaves her Hamlet to the future seniors. 
Charles Fillebrown leaves an empty place in the cafeteria after three 

years. 
Joan Fitzpatrick leaves the top shelf of her locker to any junior tall 

enough to reach it. 









H 



y- 






23 



Dolores Fontes leaves her bookkeeping books to anyone who is stupid 

enough to take them. 
Roy Fornaciari leaves to a junior boy his membership in the Zizzle 
gang. 
Audrey Fowler leaves her horn-rim glasses to any junior wishing to 

see the light. 
Jimmy Garside leaves . . . period. 
Maryellen Gault leaves quietly. 
Louise Gavoni leaves ten tired fingers. 
Rita Gavoni leaves her bookkeeping book to any junior crazy enough 

to want it. 
Mary Gibbs leaves without still knowing punctuation rules. 
Cora Glass leaves her locker to anyone who wants it. 
Beverly Gonsalves leaves the good old school days for better things 

in life. 
Robert Gordon leaves a little sophomore girl whom he has always 

thought a lot of. 
Ally Govoni leaves his office of Vice-Pres. in the Zizzle gang to any 

ingenious junior boy. 
Elizabeth Govoni leaves her blonde hair to anyone who dares to cut 

it off. 
Charles Hadaway leaves empty footprints. 
Lillian Hanelt leaves her ability to dream in study hall to Gale 

Graffam. 
Anne Hathaway leaves a drunk horse to Miss Downey. 
Ashley Holmes leaves the school to the dogs. 
Sally Holmes leaves Hamlet to any English student that hkes to 

read Shakespeare. 
Barbara Howe leaves her locker to any junior who wants it. 
Judy Jackson leaves the A.L.G. Club to anyone who knows what it 

means. 
Rudolph Jokinen leaves his quietness to anyone who wants it. 
Seth Kallio leaves the Tories of Miss Connolly's class to await the 

rise of their church state. 
Ronald Kane leaves his seat in Mrs. Urann's sixth period English class 

to anyone who wants nothing but trouble. 
Shirley Knight leaves her locker #212 to any junior who likes to boil. 
Mary Leming leaves a lot of friends behind. 
Betty Lopresti leaves her brother to the Sophomore girls — grab him 

girls, he's bashful. 
Elaine Lovell leaves her quiet ways to any noisy junior. 
Patricia Lovett leaves her past worries and problems to the next 

year's students. 
Dorothy MacDonald leaves Bookkeeping II to any junior lucky enough 

to figure it out. 
Jeanette MacNab bequests her position in the Fearless Four S. S. 

Association of Plympton to Nat Dennett. 
George Martin leaves his position as Treasurer of the Zizzle Gang to 

any junior womanhater. (He must go steady!) 
Barbara McMahon would like to leave a gum machine on every floor. 
Jane McManus leaves a 120 certificate test to any junior who is lucky 

enough to get it. 
Janet McManus leaves her space on the senior floor to any junior who 

wants it. 
Glenn McNeil leaves a scoreboard for P. H. S. 
Janet Meehan leaves to the junior class all her senior expenses and 

worries. 
Nancy Melisse leaves her Bookkeeping II books to any crazy junior 

wanting it. 
Barbara Mentzel leaves her locker to any junior crazy enough to 

clean it. 
Nancy Merritt leaves her quiet, peaceful laugh for an under-classman. 
Allan Minelli leaves all his headaches and troubles to Chippy. 



24 



Lorraine Monti leaves her paint-brush and easel to any art-minded 

junior. 
Vilma Monti leave's her basketball suit to Nancy Willis. 
Alvin Morey leaves one old newspaper bag to anyone who wants it. 
Joan Morin leaves all her senior spirit to the juniors. 
Arthur Morton leaves a battered bass drum still usable. 
Beverly Northrup leaves Plymouth for California. 
Mabel Owensleaves . . . period. 
Caroline Parcels leaves her locker to a person who will be a senior 

next. 
Hazel Parker leaves her Oregon Trail for any poor junior who wants it. 
John Patrico leaves the demon of the senior floor. 
Virginia Peck wills her baton to anyone foolish enough to go out and 

lead the band in the cold weather. 
Howard Penn leaves the study hall with peace for Mrs. Urann's nerves. 
Priscilla Phinney leaves her ding-toed ballet shoes. 
Joseph Pinto leaves Coach Walker with his mouth closed by beating 

him 22 to in a game of 21. 
Violet Pinto leaves Saint Christopher to Mr. Smiley and driver train- 
ing pupils. 
Patricia Potter leaves behind some of her excess weight for any girl 

who needs it. 
Dalton Pratt leaves Mrs. Brown in a strait jacket. 
Marilyn Pretoni leaves her Barnes, Bailey, and Jackson bookkeeping 

set to anyone crazy enough to want it. 
Linwood Raymond leaves for art school. 
Nancy Raymond leaves to Gale Graff am her ability to dream of her 

man during classes (and not know what's being said). 
Diamantina Rego leaves her Bookkeeping II book to any ambitious 

junior. 
Waldo Roby leaves his locker to any junior foolish enough to become 
a senior. 

Nancy Romano leaves . . . period! 
Barbara Roncarati leaves the driver training car for someone else 

to wreck. 
Eleanor Ruediger leaves behind her saddle shoes. 
Paula Saisa leaves . . . period! 
Leon Scagliarini leaves Mr. Pyle's home room to some ambitious 

junior. 
Helen Shwom leaves her Polish-English Dictionary to any future con- 
fused D. P. 
Florence Silva leaves her locker, which is always getting stuck, to a 

poor junior. 
Georgiana Silva leaves her typewriter to anyone who feels like 

pounding. 
Leonora Silva leaves to the juniors the privilege of climbing the extra 

flight of stairs each day. 
Lorraine Silva leaves a mirror in the girls' room to the juniors — may 

you all enjoy it as I have. 
Edward Smith leaves his job of assisting Mr. Romano to any junior 

boy who can fill the job. 
Frances Smith leaves the same size she came in! 
Adelaide Souza leaves her "A's" to some junior. 
Lillian Souza leaves her height for all those who need it. 
Carol Springer leaves all her men to Meg Savery. 
Thomas St George leaves sohool in June. 

Raymond Stringer leaves a sleeping chair in room #203 to any -soph- 
omore. 
Albion Sturgis just leaves what knowledge he doesn't have. 
Barbara Sylva leaves to Mrs. Urann the senior girls of 1951 to tease 

about their boyfriends in study hall. 
Carole Tassinari leaves . . . period! 









•3i' 



25 



Richard Tassinari leaves his white socks to any member of next 

year's first 10 who's really desperate. 
Wayne Terry leaves his Zizzle membership to any intelligent and de- 
serving junior. 

Edward Travers leaves his trig, book to all the future mathematicians. 
Barbara Turini leaves Mr. Smiley to Miss Kelly. 
Joan Vandini leaves a lot of trouble. 
Daniel Verre leaves Mrs. Urann without her fish! 
Richard Weaver leaves his three-dimensional figures to Miss Locklin. 
Jeanette Whiteley leaves her blond hair to Dianne Dyer. 
Patricia Willette leaves her back hand penmanship to Mrs. Gardner. 
Marcia Williams leaves many broken hearts. 
Alfred Wood bequeaths period II study to any junior or sophomore 

unable to keep quiet. 
Peggy Wood leaves her locker to any able junior who thinks he can 

bring love to its doors. 
Sandra Wood leaves the hope that some junior may see what's behind 

Miss Jacques' map of France. 
Charles Zahn leaves his beautifully initialled desk in #305 to a diligent 

junior who loves to read. 
Paul Zaniboni leaves intelligently. 
Richard Zaniboni leaves little Siberia and its wardens for the last 

time, thank goodness! 
The "Naughty Nine" give their name to any group of nine girls who 

are capable of living up to it. 
The "Zizzles" leave their motto "Eat, drink, and be merry for to- 
morrow you may go steady!" to all the masculine under-classmen. 



MARVELOUS INVENTIONS 

We live in a world of inventions 
That are supposed to ease our life, 
Instead they complicate living 
And increase the general strife. 

There was a man named Edison, 
Who invented the electric light, 
So now instead of sleeping 
We can sit up and study all night. 

Someone thought of the pencil, 
So our thoughts could be written out, 
And now we spend hours thinking 
Of what to write about. 

The Arabs developed algebra, 
A very useful tool, 
And now we spend a year or two 
Learning it in school. 

If only now a man exists 

Clever enough to invent 

A machine that will do our homework, 

He has my full consent. 

Anne Hathaway, '50 



SOPHOMORE BLUES 

(Apologies to Joyce Kilmer) 

I think that I shall never see 

A senior who would speak to me. 

A senior who would stoop so low 
As to murmur one "Hello." 

A senior who, with haughty looks, 
Never staggers under books. 

A senior who, with lofty airs, 
Knows that I exist — or cares! 

Upon whose face no great pride shines; 
Whose looks don't show an air sublime. 

Only "sophs" are fools like me, 
But soon a senior I shall be. 

Nancy Pellegrini '52 



26 



I CM 



1. Music, music, 
music. 



2. Miss Connolly's 
happy class. 



3. Ooh, apple pie! 



4. Hey, wait a 
minute! 



5. Get it, Ray. 



8. A great mo- 
ment. 



10. What's this? 



11. Happy typists. 



12. Oh, those lov- 
ely cocoanuts! 



27 



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31 





Who's Who In P. H. S. 


i 






Shirley Knight 


! Wittiest 




Jackie Boyer 


1 Most Determined . . 


Seth Kallio 


.Barbara McMahon 




Edward Smith 


Patricia Potter 


Best Pals 


Robert Gordon 

David Calhoun 


Carlyn Cavicchi 
.Maryellen Gault 


All Around Student 


Richard Tassinari 


. Louise Gavoni 






.Barbara Howe 


1 Biggest Swing Fan 


Joseph Pinto 


.Caroline Almeida 


Best Giggler 


Richard Weaver 


.Ellen Colpitts 


Class Artists 


Dalton Pratt 


.Lorraine Monti 


Most Studious 


Wilfred Doyon , 


.Barbara Mentzel 


Most Pep 




, Joan Vandini 


Biggest Appetite . . 




, Filizabeth Govoni 


Prettiest Smile .... 


Clyde Balboni 


, Peggy Wood 


Best Athlete 


We Have A . . . 

Knight but no day 
Penn but no ink 
Carton but no cigarettes 
Parker but no Eversharp 
Silva but no gold 
Peck but no bushel 
Wood but no nails 
Glass but no windows 
Baker but no dough 


JDorinne Ausman 




English but no French 




Martin but no McCoy 




Weaver but no loom 




Chase but no fox 






32 





FACULTY 







FACULTY 

First Row: Miss Helen Johnson, Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Miss Ellen Downey, Miss 

Margie Wilber, Mrs. Margaret Brown, Miss Jeannette Jacques, Miss Iris Albertini 
Second Row: Mrs. Helen Bagnall, Miss Ardys Farnsworth, Mr. Roland Holmes, Mr. 

Carlo Guidaboni, Mr. Edgar J. Mongan, Mr. Richard Smiley, Mr. Arthur Pyle, Miss 

Elizabeth Kelly, Mrs. Ruth Bailey 
Third Row: Mr. John Walker, Mrs. Lydia Gardner, Mr. John Packard, Mr. Mario 

Romano, Mrs. Virginia Kingman, Miss Mary Connolly, Mr. Claiborne Young 



Name Pet Peeve Heard Saying Most- 
Mr. Edgar Mongan Irrelevancies "And another thing—" 

Miss Iris Albertini You can never tell! . . . 



.... "From a psychological 
point of view — " 

Mrs. Helen Bagnall Questionnaires "Wanna buy a ticket? 

Wanna give anything?" 

Miss Mary Connolly Forty people in class- 
rooms with thirty-five seats 

Miss Ellen Downey Oh, for 35 modern desks 

and chairs that wouldn't 
squeak like the present 
1910 vintage 

Mrs. Lydia Gardner No clever answers 

for senior questionnaires 

Mr. Carlo Guidaboni Boys who aren't track- 
minded 

Mr. Roland Holmes Irrelevance "Some of you may recall" 

Miss Jeannette Jacques Loafers!! "Alors!" 



If I Were A Senior I'd— 

.Live a double life. 

Remember the past and look 
to the future. 

Enjoy many friendships in 
the Class of 1950. 

for 



"Sophomores, remember 
to cheer." 


Probably be 
points. 


praying 


"You can lead a horse to 
water but you can't 
make him drink." 


??? 




"More voice, please." 


Be a senior. 






. . Give up — at n 


iy age (' 



.Do as seniors do. 
.Work from now on. 



33 



Name 



Pet Peeve 



Miss Helen Johnson Questionnaires like this 

Miss Elizabeth Kelly Scratching chalk on 

the blackboard 

Mrs. Virginia Kingman People who do not do 

their homelessons 

Miss Nellie Locklin People who are late 

for rehearsals 

Mr. John Packard Messy sinks and 

uncleaned table tops 



Mr. Arthur Pyle Having to go through 

the lunch line for my food! 

Mrs. Miriam Raymond Commotion 

Mr. Mario Romano Not enough smiling 

faces in #304 



Mrs. Alice Urann Corridor voices 

Miss Margie Wilber "Smart alecs" 



Mr. Claiborne Young Pupils saying "may 

I bring — " 

Mrs. Margaret Brown The pupil that 

invariably forgets 

Miss Ardys Farnsworth Gum-chewing, nylons, 

and pupils asking to be 
excused from gym 



Heard Saying Most — 

"Well, now" Not ask questions like this!! 

"What do you say — am I Take the driver training 
going too fast?" course with Mr. Smiley. 

"Hush" Enjoy everyday of school. 

??? Graduate. 

"Let one neutron be a Graduate, 
girl, the other a boy — 
and—??" 

"Let me see now — where Prepare to make a living, 
were we?" 

."So much for that!" Be alarmed. 

"Get your dimes in." Hate to see June 22, 1950 

come. 

. 'Cherubs, please!" Be younger. 

."Talk louder, please." Be sorry to graduate. 

"Did you bring my Acquire a big and accurate 

pictures down?" vocabulary. 

"That's lovely," or Not ask teachers to do this. 

"Get to work." 

"I wish it were Friday." Have a lot of fun. 



Miss Elizabeth Crook 



.A person who doesn't do 
his job; hence, two jobs 
for the next fellow 



Mr. John Walker Mothers who are afraid 

Mrs. Ruth Bailey Tardy students 



'Is that O.K., Miss Egan?' 



"Two gentlemen 
gym, please!! 



.1 would do as many of you 
seniors are doing — partici- 
pate in many things, for that 
is good insurance for an in- 
teresting life. 

to the Make the most of it. 



"Can I have a slip 
for class." 



Be an "efficient" office as- 
sistant — Get it? 



34 









^m 



?M 




li : 



ers on Page 74 
35 



Best Girl Citizen 



For the past fourteen years, the Nation- 
al Society of Daughters of the American 
Revolution has asked high school seniors 
throughout the United States to select a 
girl from their number who is deserving of 
the honor of being their Best Girl Citizen. 
This year the Class of 1950 has proudly be- 
stowed this honor upon Louise Gavoni. 

For many years, Louise has been an ac- 
tive leader in school affairs. She has been a 
staff member of the Pilgrim for three years 
and is this year chairman of the senior quat- 
rain committee. In addition to her extensive participation in girls' sports, 
she has won renown as captain of the cheerleaders. With her work as a 
member of the S. A. S., glee club accompanist, editor of the Press Club, 
and editor of the Ticker she has combined outstanding scholarship, and is 
a member of the National Honor Society and the Honor Group. 

Our class is proud to present Louise Gavoni as its Best Girl Citizen. 





■ 



SENIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Glenn McNeil, Vice President; Richard Darsch, President; Mrs. Miriam Raymond, Shirley 
Knight, Secretary; Howard Penn, Treasurer 



36 




■CST 




JUNIOR CLASS OFFICERS 

Chester Bagni, Vice-President; John Pinto, President; Miss Ellen Downey; Kathryn 
Gordon, Secretary; David Priestley, Treasurer 




SOPHOMORE CLASS OFFICERS 



Seated: Harry Churchill, President; Laura Hutchinson, Secretary 

Standing: Elaine Cavicchi, Treasurer; John Hathaway, Vice-President; Miss Iris Albertini 



37 



School News 



■ ,vr • 



September — 

School opened on September 7, and with it came a new class of sen- 
iors, the largest the school has seen for many years. To give the shy new 
throng of sophomores a cordial welcome to their new life as high- 
schoolers, the S. A. S. held a Get-Acquainted Dance on September 30 in 
the gymnasium. It was very successful, as the sophomores soon lost this 
shyness and joined in the happy times of high school life. 

October — 

On October 12, Columbus Day, the school enjoyed an assembly in 
which the story of Christopher Columbus' life was recited in four parts. 
From this story we gained a new understanding of Columbus — his prob- 
lems and his achievements. 

By the middle of this month, many new projects were well underway. 
The school had decided to give its financial support this year to the Chil- 
dren's Medical Center. Under the sponsorship of the S. A. S., quotas were 
assigned to the various home rooms according to their enrollments. The 
"Bigger and Better Ticker" was also begun, and this year, with Louise 
Gavoni as editor, it was printed by the Leyden Press, instead of mimeo- 
graphed as it had been formerly. 

November — 

This was the month in which many outstanding performers made 
their debuts at the Senior Barn Dance on Armistice Day, November 11. 
The first hit of the evening was Plympton's famous "Naughty Nine", 
singing "I've Got a Lovely Bunch of Cocoanuts". Then came "The Voice 
of 1950", Eddie "Como" Smith, singing "Maybe It's Because". The last 
thrill of the evening was "The Football Game", with its own cheerleaders 
and strong offensive team. The game opened with the "Team Cheer" led 
by the "Cheering Cherubs", Howard Penn, Robert Gordon, Arthur Morton, 
David Calhoun, and John Davidson. The game of the year was being 
played, starring "Walker's Terrors" vs. ?. "Walker's Terrors" were vic- 
torious with a score of 7 to O. The game was filled with suspense as 
Shirley Knight ran over with the only touchdown of the game, and Peggy 
Wood kicked the extra point. 

At our Thanksgiving Day Assembly, we enjoyed selections by the 
Glee Club under the direction of Miss Elizabeth Crook, and also a record- 
ing of "Grandma's Thanksgiving." 

December — 

At a sports assembly Mr. Edgar Mongan and Mr. Mario Romano, ac- 
companied by the various coaches, presented the athletic awards to those 
pupils who had earned them by participating in any of the following 
sports: football, cross country, band, orchestra, girls' hockey, and cheer- 
leading. 



38 



The S. A. S. sponsored an interesting Christmas assembly, which 
featured Miss Marion Butterick, a monologuist, who recited several hum- 
orous Yuletide stories. 

January — 

In an assembly made possible by the S. A. S., Richard Burgess, a grad- 
uate of Plymouth High, gave a detailed report of his recent summer trip 
to Europe. It was an interesting and educational account, illustrated by 
beautiful colored slides. 

The senior class, in a second attempt to make their treasury swell, 
held a very successful dance in the auditorium. The committees for the 
entire dance were composed of members of the Zizzle Gang, a hopeful, 
hard-working group of senior boys. Everywhere there was a night-club 
atmosphere, and the main features of entertainment were: "The Bumble 
Bee" — Louise Gavoni playing "Bumble Boogie"; "The Onion Girl" — 
Jackie Boyer singing "I'm a Lonely Little Petunia in an Onion Patch"; 
Eddie "Como" Smith, who sang "Daddy's Little Girl" and "A Tree in the 
Meadow"; and Charlie Zahn, who sang "Again" and "Dreamer's Holiday". 

February — 

On February 15 and 16 the S. A. S. sponsored, for the second suc- 
cessive year, an operetta, THE COUNT AND THE CO-ED. It was the 

annual money-making project for the S. A. S. Mr. George Candini was 
the general director of the performance, assisted musically by Miss Eliza- 
beth Crook and with speaking by Miss Nellie Locklin. The cast and chorus 
did an excellent job and thoroughly enjoyed taking part in such a fine 
production. 

This year our Washington Day assembly was different from those of 
other years. The first feature was an "Epitaph of Washington" delivered 
by Audrey Fowler; next, the Octette sang a selection of patriotic songs, 
followed by the presentation of six different phases of Washington's life 
given as "Memories of Washington". The climax of the program was a 
short play about General Washington. 



39 




TEN-CENT-A-WEEK COLLECTORS 

First Row: Rose Romano, Joan Dries, Joan Vandini, Violet Pinto, Edward Smith, Mr. 

Mario Romano, Naomi Furtado, Roberta Anderson, Joan Neri, Shirley Holmes 
Second Row: Bernadette Kuhn, Janice Roy, Louis Mengoli, Ann English, Patricia 

Parkhurst, Lucille Zanello, Marjorie Sylvia, David Pyle, Joan Cravalho, Shirley 

Knight, Beverly Carton 
Third Row: Ronald Guidetti, Richard Villano, Paul Dern, Orman Jenkins, James 

Cameron, Raymond Bussolari, Alfred Govoni, John Scheid, Joseph Fonseca, Arthur 

Morton, Norman Mitchell, Chester Bagni 



Ten-Cent-a-Week Plan 



■?j. 



■ 

. ■ 



Our Ten-Cent-A-Week Plan has progressed into its twenty-first year, 
during which time it has operated with much success. The faithful co- 
operation of our student body in contributing their weekly dimes has 
resulted in the maintaining of our fine athletic program. Lack of student 
participation in this plan would mean a curtailment of this program and 
perhaps an extra burden for the taxpayers since no tax money is used 
to support our athletic activities. 

Though the price has remained the same for the individual student, 
the expenditure for maintaining our athletics has been more than doubled 
in comparison with that of 1929. 

Last year ninety percent of the school were members of the Ten-Cent- 
A-Week Plan, which entitled them to four home football games, nine 
basketball games, five baseball games, three assemblies, and the PILGRIM. 
Were it not for this plan the individual expenditure would have totaled 
$10.95, instead of the $3.80 collected. 

The graduates of 1950 have enjoyed these many benefits during the 
past years and feel certain that the future students of Plymouth High 
School will share this feeling. 

40 




CHEERLEADERS 

Violet Pinto, Suzanne Sharkey, Jacqueline Boyer, Louise Gavoni, Nancy Willis, Rosanne 

Rosetti, Joan Neri. 
Kneeling: Joan Vandini. 



Cheerleaders 



Whether on field or floor, the cheerleaders this year were there at 
every game, shouting for victory. 

They started a change in pep meetings with new ideas and new cheers. 
The peak of their season came on the Friday before the Stoughton football 
game. The girls arranged a funeral march for a dummy in Stoughton's 
black and orange. The result — a victory! 

These girls helped to keep the school enthusiastic and excited at all 
games. They exerted more energy than can be realized; and at their best, 
they are believed to be rivaled by no others for miles around. Noticing 
the many wins of our boys, we feel that our cheerleaders are very neces- 
sary to the school. 

A 1949 "brainstorm" of the 
P. H. S. cheerleaders is the new 
Plymouth Locomotive. At the 
half of the first team home bas- 
ketball games, the girls came 
out from beneath the archway 
chanting, "Plymouth's going to 
win!" When in the middle of 
the floor, they did their famous 
train cheer, and then went the 
same way they came, this time 
to the words, "Who're they go- 
ing to beat?" shouting the op- 
ponent's name at the end. Since 
other schools have already 
adopted this idea, we feel rather 
proud of our cheerleaders. 




41 



1. Boys will be 



2. Eddy "Como" 
Smith 



3. Ah— Thai pret- 
tiest smile! 



4. Oh— my gosh!! 



5. Correction 
please. 



6. The Bachelors 
Three — 



7. Gridiron Heroes 



8. Comfy, Butch? 



9. Why girls, how 
you changed!! 



10. Lunch time. 



11. Howdy, Mac! 



12. How's the fish 
ing, Bob? 

42 




a 



B^ 



^ , <T 








1. Smile pretty, 
fellows! 



2. The gang's all 
here. 



3. Guess who? 



4. What form! 



5. Such pep! 



6. Our great coach. 



7. Tas and John — 
A great pair! 



8. Is that your 
hand, Shirley?? 



9. Peek-a-boo! 



10. Congratulations, 
Ginny! 



11. Women-haters? 



12. A penny for 
your thoughts. 



13. Surprise! 



43 



I * 




FOOTBALL SQUAD 

First Row: Donald Govoni, Carl Turini, John Vaz, Leonard Vaz. Richard Gonsalves, 
Harold Strassel, Clifton McLean 

Second Row: Donald Jesse, Richard Butters. Robert Pimental, George Souza, Richard 
Benassi, Robert Albertini, Robert Gordon, John Andrews, Raymond Besegai, 
Chester Bagni. Harry Churchill, Howard Wood, Robert Borsari 

Third Row: Mr. Mario Romano, Stephen Tavares, Wayne Owens, Richard Tavares, 
Charles Sanderson. Walter Correa, Glenn McNeil, Charles Abbott, David Calhoun, 
Ralph Ferioli, Leonard Sullivan, Waldo Roby, Bertram Roger, Coach John Walker 



Football of '49 



As the 1949 football season opened, there were many players who 
were just beginning their career as P. H. S. gridsters. However, there 
were several who were returning for a continuance of last year's thrills 
and spills. The team this year was one of the lightest but swiftest that 
coach Johnny Walker and Faculty Marager Mario Romano had ever ex- 
perienced. An exciting and suspense-filled season began as the team took 
the field early in September with Bobby Gordon and Bobby Albertini as 
co-captains. Many new plays had been planned and worked out, and the 
boys were to make their first appearance against the seasoned team of 
Rockland High. 

Plymouth at Rockland 

On September 24 the light but shifty P. H. S. team played its first 
game of the 1949 season against Rockland High. It was a difficult game as 
the Rockland team had already played one game. Nevertheless our boys 
played an excellent game and were the first to score in the first quarter, 
as Johnny Andrews, after receiving a pass, broke away for a ninety-five 
yard dash and a touchdown. Rockland scored, and then Plymouth made 
another touchdown. It was Rockland again, and the score at the half was 
12 — 12. In the second half our lack of experience was evident, and the 
final score showed Rockland's 37 — 12 victory. 

Bridgewater at Plymouth 

Plymouth successfully met Bridgewater on October 1 for its first 
home game of the season. It was Plymouth's game from the very begin- 
ning. Johnny Andrews made three of the touchdowns, George Souza 
scored the last for our team, and all the extra points were good. It was 
impossible for Bridgewater to even dent our strong defensive line. The 
final score of the game was Plymouth 28, Bridgewater 0. 

Middleboro at Plymouth 

In this game against Middleboro on October 8, Coach Walker used his 
two platoon system against a strong Middleboro team. Both Plymouth 
and Middleboro scored for a half tally of 6 — 6. In the second half a 
Souza-to-Ferioli pass was good for another touchdown. Plymouth then 
made what was to become the winning point of the game. Middleboro 
came through with another touchdown but failed in the try for the extra 
point. The final score was Plymouth 13 — Middleboro 12. 



44 




Whitman at Plymouth 

Undefeated Whitman, looking 
for a fourth victory, met a deter- 
mined Plymouth team on October 
15, at Stephen's Field. It was 
Johnny Andrews who made an 
early score for Plymouth. Whitman 
tied, and neither team scored for the 
remainder of the half. In the second 
half, fullback George Souza carried 
the ball down the field and plunged 
over for a touchdown. The score was 
now 12 — 6 in our favor. In the 
fourth quarter, Plymouth suffered a 
serious setback when ace tackle 
Lewis Martinelli fractured his leg 
and was carried off the field. More 
determined than ever to win, Ply- 
mouth held tight with all hands un- 
til the final whistle blew, leaving the 
score Plymouth 12 — Whitman 6. Our team, thrilled at its victory, car- 
ried the coach off the field on their shoulders. 

Plymouth at Abington 
During the first half of the game against Abington on October 22 
there was much ineffective playing, and Plymouth knew they would have 
to fight harder to win. Little happened until the fourth quarter, when 
George Souza carried it over for a touchdown. With seconds remaining, 
Besegai intercepted a pass and ran sixty yards before being stopped. This 
was all in vain, however, for Plymouth was penalized. Three plays later 
the final whistle blew, and Plymouth had won 6 — 0. 

Plymouth at Hingham 
Plymouth traveled to Hingham on October 29 to play one of the most 
thrilling games of the season. Hingham was the first to score and, with 
the extra point, led at the end of the first quarter with a score of 7 — 0. 
In the second quarter Besegai broke away for a thirty-five yard run and a 
touchdown for Plymouth. The score at the half was 7 — 6 as we failed to 
score the extra point. In the beginning of the third quarter, Besegai re- 
received the ball on his own goal line and raced a hundred yards to score 
a touchdown, only to have the play called back because he had run out 
of bounds. Hingham scored again, making the score 13 — 6. It was 
Besegai again for a fifty-five yard drive and a second touchdown and the 
extra point was good. The score was now 13 — 13. Hingham scored for 
the last touchdown of the game, making the final score 19 — 13. 
Stoughton at Plymouth 
After a stinging 19 — 13 defeat at 
Hingham the Plymouth eleven, with- 
out the services of five of its regu- 
lars, were ready to meet Stoughton 
on November 5. Stoughton was the 
first to score, but in the second 
quarter it was Besegai who went off 
tackle for six yards and a touch- 
down. Harry Churchill kicked the 
all-important point. Plymouth led 
7 — 6, at the half. The third period 
was the hardest fought quarter the 
fans had ever witnessed. Johnny 
Andrews faded back and threw a 
long pass to Besegai, who raced over 
the goal for a touchdown. With Ply- 
mouth leading 13 to 6, Churchill 
again kicked the extra point, making 
the final score 14 — 6. 




45 




. ■ 



BOYS' BASKETBALL SQUAD 

First Row: Ronald Juliani, Clyde Balboni, William Drew, Henry Savi, John Wood, 

John Pinto 
Second Row: David Priestley, Paul Zaniboni, Richard Tassinari, John Andrews, Coach 

Jeff Nunez, Richard Burgess, Glenn McNeil, Linwood Raymond, Raynor Taylor 
Third Row: Leonard Sullivan, Wayne Caton, Joseph Freitas, George Clarke, Raymond 

Bussolari, Richard Butters, Walter Nelson, Louis Mengoli 
Fourth Row: Michael Barrett, Brooks Johnson, Robert Holton, Donald Reid, Joseph 

Mondeau, Earl Burgess, Harry Churchill 

Hoopster Highlights 

The Plymouth Blue and Whites started the season off with a non- 
league game against Deering High School of Portland, Maine on December 
22. The boys from Plymouth played a hard game as Captain Johnny 
Andrews set the pace with twelve points. The boys lost, however, by the 
close score of 33 to 37. 

The second game was played in Memorial Hall, where the schoolboys 
squared off against the Alumni on December 30. Plymouth held the lead 
throughout the entire game and were ahead by a score of 49 to 33 at the 
final bell. 

The first game of 1950 was played January 3, at Braintree. Plymouth 
played so well during the first half that the half score was 16 to 16, and 
the big boys from Braintree knew they had to play harder to win. The 
Blue and Whites slowed down in the last half, however, and lost the game 
35 to 49. 

On January 6 Wareham came to Memorial Hall to face Coach Joffrey 
Nunez' chargers, and soon found out that Plymouth was on its toes. The 
final score was 52 to 38 in favor of P.H.S. 

The first league game was on January 10, when Middleboro traveled 
to Memorial Hall and was defeated. Linwood Raymond and Dick Tassin- 
ari were the high scorers with 16 and 11 points respectively. 

The team then moved to Hingham on January 13 in hopes of chalking 
up their second league victory but were upset by a strong opposing five. 
John Andrews was the top man for Plymouth, scoring 13 points. In the 
second half of the game, Johnny was lost to the team because of fouls. 
This was a serious blow, and the final score was Plymouth 44, Hingham 60. 

On January 17 the local five played Abington at home. The locals 
didn't have much trouble with the opposition and were leading at half 
time by a 24 to 18 score. At the final buzzer, the boys had chalked up 
another victory, 50 to 37. Glenn McNeil took top honors, scoring 12 points, 

46 



i*i 



while Linwood Raymond had 10 points to his credit. 

With two league games won, the Blue and Whites visited Weymouth 
for a non-league contest on January 19. The game was the hardest and 
fastest Plymouth had ever played. Raymond Bussolari, a promising soph- 
omore, won the game by scoring three points in the last few minutes of 
play. The final score left Plymouth with a 47 to 46 victory. High scorers 
were Ray Bussolari and Glenn McNeil with 14 and 12 points respectively. 

Whitman was next on the list of league games, and the Plymouth five 
went to Whitman on January 24, to try for their third league victory. 
Coach Nunez' chargers won by a narrow margin in a thrilling game, 40 to 
36. Ray Bussolari was again high scorer for the locals, with 12 points. 

Hingham then came to Memorial Hall on January 27, to try to whip 
the Plymouth boys again, but they met with stiff opposition. The locals 
this time whipped Hingham by a score of 50 to 34. Glenn McNeil and 
Dick Tassinari took the honors with 14 and 12 points respectively. 

The real test came in the next game when the Blue and Whites played 
against Rockland. A win could mean a tie for the championship. The 
game was thrilling, hard-fought, and fast, and when the final buzzer 
sounded, Rockland had won by two points, 30 to 28. 

Plymouth then traveled to Abington on February 3 in hopes of a sec- 
ond victory over the boys in green. Plymouth won this game with little 
trouble, the final score being 47 to* 32. Dick Tassinari and Johnny Andrews 
took top honors, scoring 17 and 15 points respectively. 

The next game was with Middleboro on February 7, on their own 
court; and again the Plymouth boys won by a wide margin, the locals hav- 
ing a field day with the ball. The final score was 74 to 39, with Dick Bur- 
gess scoring 15 points and Dick Tassinari scoring 13. 

Again Plymouth faced Rockland, this time at Rockland High on Feb- 
ruary 10. This was another hard, fast game with a possible tie for the 
championship again, if Plymouth could win; but Rockland again nosed 
out the Blue and Whites by two points, 38 to 36. Linnie Raymond took 
top honors for Plymouth, scoring 9 points, with Johnny Andrews scoring 7. 

On February 14, Coyle High visited Memorial Hall for the first game 
with Plymouth in two years. The game was exceptionally slow; and when 
it ended, Coyle High was the victor by one point, 43 to 42. Johnny 
Andrews was on the top of the scoring list, this time with 15 points to 
his credit. 

On February 17, Plymouth played its last home game, also the last 
game of the season. Whitman, the opponent, suffered a heavy defeat at 
the hands of the locals. Linwood Raymond had a lot to say about the 
67 to 30 score, making a total of 19 points. 

The Blues and Whites were then invited to the South Shore Tourney 
in Brockton, and we won the first game with Middleboro by a 56 to 40 
score. Dick Tassinari chalked up an individual score of 18 points. The 
second game of the tourney was 
against Oliver Ames of North 
Easton, and this the local boys al- 
so added to their list of victories. 
The game was a thrilling one with 
the final score of 35 to 30. Lin- 
wood Raymond was high scorer, 
with 12 points. The next game 
seemed like a certain win for the 
P. H. S. hoopsters, who would be- 
come the district champions, but 
the locals couldn't seem to find the 
hoop and lost by a 39 to 36 score 
to Whitman. Lin Raymond again 
was tops with 10 points to his 
credit. 

The team will be losing six senior players this June: 
mond, John Andrews, Paul Zaniboni, Richard Tassinari, 
and Richard Burgess. Next year's team should be a winner, regardless of 
the losses, with Raymond Bussolari, George Clarke, and Richard Butters 
heading the list of 1950 and '51 players. 




Linwood Ray- 
Glenn McNeil, 



47 






c / 



ft 










1 






LEAGUE GAMES 




DATE 


P.H.S. 


OPPONENT 


Score 


Jan. 


10— H 


51 


Middleboro 


24 


Jan. 


13— A 


44 


Hingham 


60 


Jan. 


17— H 


50 


Abington 


37 


Jan. 


24— A 


40 


Whitman 


36 


Jan. 


27— H 


50 


Hingham 


34 


Jan. 


31— H 


28 


Rockland 


30 


Feb. 


3— A 


47 


Abington 


32 


Feb. 


7— A 


74 


Middleboro 


39 


Feb. 


10— A 


36 


Rockland 


38 


Feb. 


17— H 

H - Here 


67 


Whitman 

A - Away 


30 




• 





48 




CROSS-COUNTRY SQUAD 

First Row: Roland Bolduc, William Drew, Thomas St George, Wayne Terry, James 
Cameron, Randall Douglas, Roy Fornaciari 

Second Row: Mr. Carlo Guidaboni, Dennis Smith, Norman Mitchell, John Hathaway, 
Raymond Bussolari, Lawrence Benassi, Edward Pickard, Earl Burgess 



Cross Country 



Cross country, which was revived here in the fall of 1946, got under 
way again this year with thirteen boys reporting. Wayne Terry was 
chosen captain of the squad, and coach Carlo Guidaboni soon had his team 
pounding the dirt. 

The team made a fine start when on September 22 they traveled to 
Middleboro and defeated them by a score of 15 to 47. Captain Wayne 
Terry finished first; James Cameron, second; Roy Fornaciari, third; Ed- 
ward Pickard, fourth; and Thomas St George, fifth. 

On October 12, Rockland came to Plymouth and returned home with 
a 15 to 55 victory over our boys. 

On October 24, Weymouth visited Plymouth and defeated us by a 
score of 19 to 37. Captain Wayne Terry finished second; Roy Fornaciari, 
seventh; Edward Pickard, eighth; James Cameron, ninth; and Thomas St 
George, eleventh. These were the first five men to finish for Plymouth. 



49 



Plymouth traveled to Braintree to compete in the South Shore Inter- 
scholastic District meet against such towns as Braintree, Quincy, North 
Quincy, Rockland, Milton, and others. We finished in eighth place in 
this meet. 

In November, we went to Franklin for the Class A and B Interscho- 
lastic Meet. We finished in twelfth place among all the other teams in the 
state. Also in November, Plymouth traveled to Rockland to take part in 
the Fifth Annual South Shore Cross-Country Meet. We came in second 
in the meet. The final scores were Rockland 26, Plymouth 66, Canton 82, 
Middleboro 109, and Holbrook 110. 




TRACK TEAM 

First Row: Randall Douglas, William Drew, Glenn McNeil, Mr. Carlo Guidaboni, Wayne 
Terry, James Cameron, Robert Gordon 

Second Row: Chester Bagni, Theodore Swenson, Stephen Tavares, Roy Fornaciari, 
Thomas St George, Leon Scagliarini, Roland Bolduc, Howard Penn, John Pinto 

Third Row: Dennis Smith, David Pyle, Franklin Silva, John Hathaway, Norman 
Mitchell, Lawrence Benassi, Walter Correa, Edward Pickard, Richard Kierstead, 
Richard Silva 



50 



mm 




1. Study hall. 



2. Hep, hep! 



3. That's our 
Wayne! 



4. Now listen here. 



5. Hungry, Eddy? 



6. The Yacht Cluh 
dance. 



7. Plymouth's 
gonna win! 



8. No tiptoes, 
please. 



9. Hello, P. H. S. 



10. My, how busy! 



51 



■ 
■I 




GIRLS' HOCKEY TEAM 

First Row: Florence Silva, Louise Gavoni, Caroline Almeida, Virginia Peck, Joan 

Vandini, Dorinne Ausman, Jane Clough 
Second Row: Ann English, Violet Pinto, Diamantina Rego, Miss Ardys Farnsworth, 

Anne Hathaway, Nancy Merritt, Jacqueline Boyer, Judith Jackson 



"Black and Blues" 



At the close of the 1949 hockey season Coach Carolyn Parren and the 
team really had the "blues". Looking over the record, they found it not 
impressive. 

The season opened with almost forty girls reporting for practice. 
Ginny Peck was elected captain of the first team. 

To start the season off, the first team played the second and was suc- 
cessful in defeating them by a score of 2 — 0. 

The first official game of the season was played on October 10 at Dux- 
bury. Duxbury's first team defeated Plymouth's first by a score of 4 — 1. 
The one goal for Plymouth was made by Violet Pinto. The second team 
fared better, defeating Duxbury's seconds 3 — 0. 

On October 19, Plymouth entertained one of its old rivals, Hingham, 
at Stephens Field. The first team was again defeated, this time by a score 
of 3 — 0. The seconds were also outdone by Hingham at this time, with a 
score of 1 — 0. 

The Plymouth first and second teams then traveled to Middleboro on 
November 9, and there the first team was again overthrown, the score 
ending 3 — in Middleboro's favor. The second team, however, managed 
to defeat Middleboro's seconds by a score of 2 — 1. 

At Hingham, once again, our first team was outdone by a score of 
3 — 0, and the second team was defeated by a score of 1 — 0. 

Middleboro came to Plymouth for the last game of the season and 
succeeded in putting over two goals while our girls couldn't push any 
across; on the other hand, the seconds defeated the Middleboro seconds 
by a score of 1 — 0. 

The 1949 season ended with an unsuccessful year as far as records are 
concerned, but with every girl showing good old school spirit, win or lose. 



52 




GIRLS' BASKETBALL TEAM 

First Row: Arlene Motta, Louise Gavoni, Caroline Almeida, Violet Pinto, Joan Vandini, 

Dorinne Ausman, Jacqueline Boyer 
Second Row: Miss Ardys Farnsworth, Rosanne Rossetti, Janice Williams, Virginia 

Norris, Nancy Prindle, Marguerite Holmes, Ann Dempsey, Elaine Cavicchi, Judith 

Jackson 



"Hoopsters" 



With the familiar cry of "basketball" in the girls' locker room, 63 girls 
reported for practice, with hopes of first team positions. After three prac- 
tices, all but twenty-seven girls were dropped and two teams were set up. 

After more practicing, the two teams played a hard-fought game in 
Duxbury against a very determined team. The first team came from be- 
hind to defeat Duxbury 33 — 23. The second team was defeated 22 — 33. 

Plymouth played Kingston in the Plymouth gym for its second game. 
Kingston outscored Plymouth, 39 — 32. Plymouth seconds were also 
beaten, 18 — 16. 

Plymouth, returning Kingston's visit, was again outscored, 55 — 45, 
in a scrimmage game. 

When the blue and white girls entered their gym on January 11th, 
they found a tall and eager Middleboro team. This Middleboro team 
swamped our girls, 39 — 12. The seconds defeated Middleboro seconds, 
25—19. 

Plymouth journeyed to Wareham, where they were defeated by a 
score of 38 — 23. The Plymouth second team was swamped by 32 — 6. 

Plymouth went to Middleboro with strong hearts for their next game, 
only to be sunk by the score of 64 — 27 by the black and orange girls. 

The last game was scheduled to be played with Wareham in Ply- 
mouth, but was canceled because of bad weather conditions. 

Looking over the season's record, the girls wish they could have 
played Duxbury all season, but they are sure .tnat their luck and basket 
eyes wouldn't have held out any better against them than they did against 
the other teams. 



53 



■ 




,f 



54 



m 



■42K. 




LATIN CLASS 

Jane Clough, Louise Gavoni, Sylvia Corsini, Miss Margie Wilber 

Who's Who in Myths 



The messenger God beyond tree tops I flew, 
Skilled in trickery and a mischievous thief, too. 
My beginning is in the word which to us means buy. 
My middle, a little Latin word equivalent to why. 
My last is in Olympus the place where I live. 
My whole is in this clue which I now give. 
When heat and cold pervade the town 
I'm the Latin God who runs up and down. 

Sylvia Corsini '50 



My first is slang for girl 

Which keeps you in a whirl; 

My second's in the scale, 

The sixth, for your avail; 

My third, a drink from India, 

Japan, or far Mongolia; 

My last is first in Amulet 

And also in the alphabet; 

My whole's a statue borne of strife 

Which Aphrodite brought to life. 

Louise Gavoni '50 



My first is in go, 
My second in so. 
The next is the same, 
And the last is in aim. 
A son of great Neptune 
From down in the deep 
Reached for the moon 
And on me did creep 



Jane Clough '50 



My first expresses grief 
And sound of great relief; 
My next a method for 
The opening of a door; 
My whole's a goddess spared 
For whom young Cupid cared. 

Louise Gavoni '50 



Answers on Page 7 4 



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57 



P. H. S. Literature 



SEASONS 

Winter, summer, spring or fall, 
Which to you is best of all? 
Maybe springtime brings you ease 
When the birds are on the trees, 
And the ice at last is gone 
From the lake, the brook and pond. 

Is the summer your desire, 
When the sun is so much higher, 
With its birds and bees and flowers, 
And you while away the hours? 

Then the fall comes rolling 'round, 
Leaving summer southward bound; 
And the leaves make winter's bed 
With their colors, gold and red. 

Is it winter that you like. 
With its snow so cold and- white, 
When around the fire you mingle, 
Planning gifts from gay Kris Kringle? 
Winter, summer, spring, or fall, 
Tell me, which is best of all? 

Winifred Stenquist '52 



A PRAYER 

Give me a dawn of radiant hue 

And an open road to follow; 

Send me a wind to blow back my cares 

And the low, clear call of the swallow. 

Give me a song to sing on the way, 
A melody lilting and sweet; 
Give me a dream to hold in my heart 
An air castle yet incomplete. 

Give me a moon and a bit of sky 
And a path with never an end; 
And then help me share it gladly — 
Bind it close with the heart of a friend. 

Peter O'Brien '51 



ICICLES 

Listen to the 

Silvery tinkle 

Of tiny stalactites 

Of frozen fire 

That shake and shiver, 

Quake and quiver, 

In the morning light 

And brusque, cold wind. 



Marilyn Griffith '52 



If Only Brains Were Sold! 

If only brains were sold! Then there would be no need to cram for 
finals. School children would have more time for outside activities, and 
wouldn't need to say that they must hurry home to do homework. Teach- 
ers would not have the nuisance of making out "the school child's friend" 
— the deficiency slip. Not only could we profit by this phenomenon, but 
so could those who govern our country. It might bring to an end labor- 
capital troubles, bureaucracy and high taxes, and thus profit everyone. 
What a Utopia! 

Just think of the pleasure in stepping into an all-plastic store, gliding 
up to the "brain counter," and purchasing multi-colored brains. 

Since I conceived this revolutionary plan, I shall place my billion 
dollar store on the corner of Fifth Avenue and 42nd Street, with an illum- 
inated sign reading "Bigger and Better Bargains in Boyer's Brain Bazaar". 

At first my exotic brains will not sell below two dollars a set, but, 
when further developments are made in plastics, I should be able to re- 
duce the price considerably. 

As I think about the many people whose burdens will be lightened 
and whose lives will be eased, I cannot wait to start my new project. Of 
course, there is one mere detail that may briefly postpone my grand open- 
ing. I may encounter some difficulty in locating a supply of my stock-in- 
trade large enough to meet the overwhelming demand. 

Jacqueline Boyer '50 



58 



DREAMS 



FIRST LOVE 



I stopped upon a hill to rest 

Once on a summer's day, 

And watched the fleecy clouds on high — 

A mass of white and gray. 

Some took the forms of wooly lambs, 
Frolicking in the sky; 
They seemed to gambol back and forth, 
And each of them was spry. 

The gentle wind then scattered them, 
And soon I saw a face; 
It might have been the shepherd boy, 
With staff, that took their place. 

With nature putting on a show 
No man could ever make, 
It is such fun to lie and dream 
Though one is wide awake. 

Barbara Brenner, '52 



I just can't think of what to say, 
Except, "I love you more each day." 
And when I press your lips to mine, 
I'm drunk with dreams that are like wine; 
And when your gentle voice rings true, 
My weary heart revives anew; 
You're faithful, loyal, gentle, pet, 
My lovely, graceful clarinet. 

Rollene Zaniboni '52 



SINFUL WORLD 

Where is the world that God intended, 
What's happened to the earth today; 
Where have his followers descended, 
Why does the future seem so gray? 

Why must man destroy his brother, 
Why must he create such sorrow; 
What's happened to their love for others, 
What is in store for us tomorrow? 

Margaret Sylvia '51 



MY DRESS? 

One day I thought I'd make a dress, 
My parents I'd surprise; 
So I bought a lot of expensive cloth 
And a pattern just my size. 

Upon the floor I spread the cloth, 
Upon the cloth the pattern — 
I took the shears and cut it out 
Not knowing what would happen. 

The pieces then were sewed together, 
The dress tried on for size, 
I looked at me in the mirror 
But quickly shut my eyes. 

The day I thought I'd make a dress 
My family I did surprise — 
They thought I was off to a costume ball 
And that was my disguise. 

Ann English '50 



PEACE? 

So many things have taken place 

In the last few years gone by, 

That we've found it hard to understand 

Just what? and how? and why? 

In World War I we fought our best 
For a peace we could retain. 
A few years passed; 'twas gone again, 
And little did we gain! 

Then World War II, a second fight 
For the peace we wanted most. 
We won this war, but have we won 
This peace of which we boast? 

Shirley Knight, '50 



59 



THE PERFECT DAUGHTER 



COZY COMFORT 



If I could learn to be that girl 

Whom mother thinks the choicest pearl, 

With level head and judgment strong, 

Incapable of doing wrong; 

If I could learn to hide my fears, 

Withstand all grief, restraining tears; 

If I could learn to be as true 

To all my friends as they are, too; 

If I could learn to work and play, 

And do my share from day to day; 

If I could be an honest miss, 

And practice all I can in this; 

If I could learn to care for health, 

Not think too much of earthly wealth; 

If I could be so kind and good 

That I would strengthen brotherhood; 

If I'd admit when I'm to blame, 

Be unconcerned for rank or fame; 

If I could strive with mind, not might, 

And know just what is wrong and right; 

If I could live to love and learn, 

Be loved and guided in return; 

Have deepest faith in Him above — 

Then I'd deserve my mother's love. 

Louise Gavoni '50 



MAY I- 



I'm sitting very quietly 

At the local dance, 

When pretty soon a beau comes o'er 

In something of a trance. 

I know what he's about to do, 
But there is no escape. 
So when he asks, I just say, "Yes." 
Then his arms around me drape. 

He waltzes me across the floor, 
Say, this isn't quite so bad 
As all the girls had said 'twould be. 
Oh, boy! I'll bet they're mad. 

Rita Gavoni '50 



Whenever gloom's around me. 
And hope turns to despair, 
! Tis then I long to hear 
Your footsteps on the stair. 

And when I hear you at the door, 
I haste to fling it wide; 
And throw my arms around you, dear, 
To take you safe inside. 

We cuddle warm beside the fire 
And have a little chat — 
You are the best of company, 
My loving Cheshire cat. 

Sylvia Churchill '52 



MUSING 

I walk along the self-same streets 
That Pilgrim feet once trod. 

My home is this historic town 

Where they once worshipped God. 

I wonder what they'd think of me, 

As I stand by the "Rock"? 
Three hundred thirty years have passed- 

They might get quite a shock. 

My wind-blown hair and painted lips, 
Short dress, with ankles showing — 

I know they would be horrified I 
A hussy — not worth knowing. 

Such difference custom might explain, 
Once they had looked around 

And seen the changes time has wrought 
On their wild and cherished ground. 

Our progress viewed, what would I find, 
As I faced them standing there — 

A smile of approval in their look, 
Or heartbreak and despair? 

Beverly Carton '50 



60 



The Sciences 




Science of Plant and Animal Life 




Mechanics — Heat — Light — Electricity — Sound 




R 
A 
D 
I 




Transmission of Sound 



61 



1. Study hard, fel- 
lows. 



2. Those Zizzles 
Again! 



3. 1:20 



4. A great sport! 



5. What's he read- 
ing? 



6. Taxi — 



7. What pretty 
smiles! 



8. My, isn't he 
tame! 



9. A stitch in time. 



10. All together 
now! 




HIGH SCHOOL 



11. Such busy girls! 



62 









v 



^ r 



im 




TRIGONOMETRY 

Richard Malaguti, John Carton, Beverly Carton, Ann English, Edward .Travers, Richard 
Weaver, Paul Zaniboni 



Math 



Problem: 1. 

A goose weighs 10 lbs. and V2 its own weight, what is the weight of 
the goose? 

Problem: 2. 

You have four nines, arranged in any order. Can you rearrange those 
four nines so that they will equal 100? 

Problem: 3. 

A train starts daily from San Francisco to New York and one daily 
from New York to San Francisco, the journey lasting five days. How many 
trains will a traveler meet in journeying from New York to San Francisco? 

Problem: 4. 

John Andrews, Captain of the P.H.S. basketball team, can dribble a 
basketball 27 times in a minute. How many times will he dribble it in a 
32 minute game? 

Problem: 5. 

A snail climbing up a post 20 feet high, ascends five feet every day 
and slips down four feet every night. How long will it take him to go to 
the top of the post? 

Problem: 6. 

Divide the number 50 into two such parts that, if the greater part be 
divided by seven, and the lesser multiplied by three, the sum of the quo- 
tient and product will make 50. 

Problem: A Puzzler 

A plank was to be cut in two; the carpenter cut it half through on 
each side, and found he had two feet still to cut. How was that? 

Answers on Page 74 



63 




FRENCH III CLASS 

Miss Jeannette Jacques, Shirley Knight, Sylvia Corsini, Ann English, Richard Weaver, 
Louise Gavoni, Jane Clough 



■ I 



Deca, Dela Partout 

We toiled for hours in our little French class r 
With themes, dictations, and tests to pass. 
Our knowledge of verbs and nouns increased, 
But this didn't mean that our worries ceased. 
Three books in French to report upon, 
An oral topic to give — did we scorn? 
Why no, we went our merry way 
And enjoyed Bazin's Les Oberle. 
Les Miserables was fun for all; 
DeMaupassant couldn't make us fall. 
French was like a game : you see, 
More joy than we thought it would be. 
Our lives will be scattered after this class, 
But the work's not in vain for each lad and lass 
Since our dreams to France — to Paris wander; 
If we can't travel, why do we ponder? 
Somehow, somewhere, we'll find use for French, 
These cartoons show us ten years hence! 

Sylvia Corsini 






■ 



64 



assan-fc 




LHw+i 



Shirley — "Attention, classe"! 




Ann — Errant! 







^» 



*WVjiV 



JitdL. 



L noun 




Richard — "Quelle belle vie!" 



Louise — Musicienne de grande renommee! 



_ — /^SEnX — 




Jane — "Au revoir, mes bien aimes." 



Sylvia— "Gai Paris!" 



65 




PILGRIM STAFF 

First Row: Sylvia Corsini, Lorraine Monti, Louise Gavoni, Edward Smith, Shirley 

Knight, Richard Weaver, Paul Zaniboni, Anne Hathaway, Beverly Carton, Jacqueline 

Boyer 
Second Row: Anne Drew, Constance Crowell, Frances Smith, Florence Silva, Violet 

Pinto, Mr. Roland Holmes, Joan Vandini, Rosanne Rossetti, Nancy Merritt, Judith 

Jackson, Audrey Fowler, Maryellen Gault 
Third Row: Jane Clough, Cassandra Wood, Ann English, Carol White, Neilia Halunen, 

Richard Darsch, Franklin Bassett, Dorothy Chase, Barbara Brenner, Ann Hilton, 

Marilyn Griffith 
Fourth Row: Jane Hilton, Suzanne Sharkey, Patricia Darsch, Joan Borgatti, Priscilla 

Johnson. Jacqueline Smith, Joan Neri, Diamantina Rego 




8fifl 



STUDENT ACTIVITIES SOCIETY 

First Row: Rosanne Rossetti, Laura Hutchinson, Suzanne Sharkey, Alton Morisi, Seth 

Kallio, Barbara McMahon, Roy Alsheimer, Beverly Carton, Shirley Knight, Marcia 

Williams 
Second Row: Ernest Souza, Jane Hilton, Richard Darsch, Miss Jeannette Jacques, Mrs. 

Helen Bagnall, Miss Ellen Downey, John Scheid, Dorothy Ellis, Dorinne Ausman, 

Chester Bagni 
Third Row: Brian Finnegan, Harry Churchill, Leon Scagliarini, Beverly Weston, Glenn 

McNeil, Mary Cotti, Richard Martinelli, Stephen Tavares, Sheldon Kaplow 

66 










LIBRARY STAFF 

First Row: Dimitra Colas, Marie Carr, Judith Jackson, Mr. Arthur Pyle, Anne Hathaway, 

Ann Hilton, Nan Appling 
Second Row: Gloria Correa, Joan Vandini, Violet Pinto, Jeannette Whiteley, Audrey 

Billings, Jane Clough, Bernadette Kuhn, Faith Garnett 
Third Row: Joan Vitti, Claudette DiStaula, Marcia Williams, Neilia Halunen, Marie 

Fontaine, Janice Williams, Marilyn Griffith, Audrey Fowler, Rosanne Rossetti 




OFFICE ASSISTANTS 

First Row: Ann Capozucca, Lorraine Monti, Richard Darsch, Mrs. Ruth Bailey, Wayne 

Terry, Virginia Peck, Kathryn Gordon 
Second Row: Dorinne Ausman, Caroline Almeida, Joan Morin, Mary Cotti, Audrey 

Fowler, Patricia Lovett 



67 




PRESS CLUB 



First Row: Joan Vandini, Louise Gavoni, Diamantina Rego 

Second Row: Jacqueline Boyer, Wayne Terry, Alton Morisi, Miss Ellen Downey, Richard 
Martinelli, Joan Borgatti 




BANK TELLERS 

First Row: Joan Tibbetts, Ann Hall, Marion Cadman, Miss Elizabeth Kelly, Judith 

Jackson, Suzanne Sharkey, Florence Silva 
Second Row^; Rollene Santos, Nancy Pellegrini, Constance Kingman, Roy Alsheimer, 

Ruth Chase, Richard Darsch, Nancy Merritt, Nancy Douylliez, Nancy Willis, Joan 

Cavacco 



68 




OCTETTE 

First Row: Joan Fitzpatrick, Laura Hutchinson, Louise Gavoni, Sylvia Corsini, Jean 

Douglas 
Second Row: Jane Hilton, Adelaide Souza, Miss Elizabeth Crook, Cassandra Wood, 

Anne Hathaway 

-- - fty^ 





GIRLS' GLEE CLUB 

First Row: Dorothy Chase, Neilia Halunen, Joan Dries, Rebecca Small, Carol White, 
Jane Hilton, Anna Stefani, Carol Henry, Patricia Lovett, Louise Gavoni, Adelaide 
Souza, Diamantina Rego 

Second Row: Constance Crowell, Frances Smith, Janice Tibbetts, Florence Silva, 
Marilyn Savery, Joan Fitzpatrick, Miss Elizabeth Crook, Janet Costa, Barbara 
McMahon, Doris Youngman, Shirley Knight, Patricia Potter, Beverly Carton 

Third Row: Jeanette Doten, Suzanne Sharkey, Hazel Parker, Marlene Proctor, Mabel 
Owens, Nancy Bailey, Jean Douglas, Roberta Anderson, Laura Hutchinson, Patricia 
Pickard, Anne Drew, Yvonne Cravalho, Natalie Bent, Jane Clough, Sylvia Corsini, 
Ann Hall, Elaine Cavicchi, Nancy Dunlap 

Fourth Row: Anne Hathaway, Rollene Perry, Laurien Enos, Judith Jackson, Nancy 
Merritt, Barbara Garside, Lorraine Lewis, Joan Cavacco, Patricia Darsch, Ann 
Hilton, Nancy St. George, Priscilla Johnson, Eleanor Ruediger, Jacqueline Smith, 
Betty Krueger, Marjorie Sylvia, Marilyn Griffith, Dorothy MacDonald, Ann English 

Fifth Row: Cora Glass, Marjorie Thomas, 3arbara Brenner, Paula Saisa, Kathryn 
Swanton, Joan Cavicchi, Beverly Weston, Ruth Chase, Marie Fontaine, Sylvia 
Melahoures, Janice Williams. Lucille Zanello. Ann Montanari, Ann Dempsey, Marcia 
Williams, Cassandra Wood 

69 







BAND 

First Row: Ira Carlin, Karl Bosari. Mario Crociati, David Mello, Paul Baratta, Gerald 

Sicco, Joseph Teves, Richard Christie 
Second Row: Mr. John Pacheco, Alfred Vierra, Alfred Lopresti, Robert Wager, Wayne 

Caton, Virgina Peck, Patricia Potter, Walter Nelson. Arthur Morton, George Martin, 

John Wood, Patricia Smiley 
Third Row: Leonard Vaz, Robert Traverso, Eldon Sherman, Charles Sanderson, William 

Zucchelli, Peter O'Brien, Raymond Bussolari, Edward Travers, Joseph Mondeau, 

Orman Jenkins 




ORCHESTRA 

First Row: Marilyn Griffith, Suzanne Sharkey, Mr. John Pacheco, Jane Clough, Patricia 

Pickard 
Second Row: Janice Williams, Wayne Caton, Arthur Morton, Rollene Zaniboni, Joseph 

Mondeau, George Martin, Sylvia Melahoures 
Third Row: James Cameron, Joseph Pinto, Glenn McNeil, William St George 



70 




RADIO CLUB 

First Row: Richard Martinelli, George Martin, Jack Patrico, Mr. John Packard, Albion 

Sturgis, Robert Gordon, Alfred Govoni, Howard Penn 
Second Row: Gerald Bastoni. Wilfred Doyon, John Davidson, Paul Zaniboni, Roy 

Fornaciari, Frank Duthie, Randall Douglas 




PHOTOGRAPY CLUB 

First Row: Sylvia Melahoures, Mr. Claiborne Young, Franklin Bassett, Joan Borgatti 
Second Row: Dorothy Chase, Theodore Swenson, Richard Martinelli, Donald Avery, 
Beverly Carton 



71 




CHILDREN'S MEDICAL CENTER COMMITTEE 

First Row: Sheldon Kaplow, Dorinne Ausman, Kathryn Gordon, Brian Finnegan, 

Marilyn Savery, Laura Hutchinson, Ernest Souza 
Second Row: Marcia Williams, Barbara Turini, Beverly Weston, Harry Churchill, Glenn 

McNeil, Seth Kallio, Dorothy Ellis, Mary Cotti, Janet Pretoni 



BASEBALL OF '50 

The 1950 baseball season opened in the spring with many new re- 
cruits, as well as veteran players, reporting for practice. There was a bet- 
ter schedule than usual, because, for the first time in many years, twelve 
regular games, with several practice games, were played. There was more 
than usual interest throughout the spring which was a very good sign 
because baseball has always been considered the "national pastime." 






Schedule 

April 24 — Hingham (Away) May 

April 27— Rockland (Here) May 

May 1 — Middleboro (Away) May 

May 3 — Wareham (Here) May 

May 4 — Abington (Here) May 

May 8 — Whitman (Here) May 



11 — Hingham (Here) 
15 — Rockland (Away) 
17 — Wareham (Away) 
18— Middleboro (Here) 
22 — Abington (Away) 
25 — Whitman (Away) 






72 




HONOR GROUP 



tl 



First Row: Florence Silva, Barbara McMahon, Joan Vandini, Beverly Carton, Shirley 

Knight 
Second Row: Lorraine Monti, Louise Gavoni, Sylvia Corsini, Barbara Mentzel 
Third Row: Diamantina Rego, Ann English, Audrey Fowler, Mrs. Miriam Raymond 
Fourth Row: Wilfred Doyon, Mary Cotti, Charles Hadaway, Anne Hathaway, Seth 

Kallio 



MASSASOIT CHAPTER of the NATIONAL HONOR SOCIETY 

The charter for the Massasoit Chapter of the National Honor Society 
was granted to our school in 1929. A certain per cent of the members in 
the upper fourth of the junior and senior classes, who have been enrolled 
in this school for at least one year, are elected by the students and the 
faculty. The ideals recognized and upheld by the Honor Society are — 
Scholarship, Character, Leadership, and Service. This year the members 
were elected on March 21, and the impressive ceremony of induction was 
held on April 6. Those newly elected to the society were: Mary Cotti, 
Wilfred Doyon, Barbara McMahon, Kathryn Gordon, Priscilla Johnson, 
Alton Morisi, Joan Neri, John Pinto, and Rosanne Rossetti. The re-elected 
members were: Beverly Carton, Louise Gavoni, Seth Kallio, Shirley 
Knight, Barbara Mentzel, Lorraine Monti, Diamantina Rego, and Joan 
Vandini. 



73 



Answer Page 



Answers to Who's Who In Myths — Page 55 
Mercury, Mt. Ossa, Galatea, Pysche. 



Answers to Latin Crossword Puzzle 



DOWN 

1. Water — aqua 

2. Under — sub 

3. Wing— ala 

5. Three— tria 

6. Put — pone 

7. So Much — adeo 

13. Journey — iter 

14. Me — me 

15. And— et 

16. Open — pate 

20. These— has 

21. Why— cur 
24. By— a 



ACROSS 
1. To— ad 
4. And— et 
6. Girl— puella 

8. Because — ob (on account of) 

9. Near — ad 

10. Give — da 

11. But— sed 

12. Sun— sol 
14. Me — me 

17. So— tarn 

18. And— et 

19. My — mea 

22. Sky— caelum 

23. By— a 



Answers to Latin Picture Puzzle — Page 57. 

Nauta -|- Urbs — Taurus -|- Gens -\- Triduum — Nuntius -4- Ce — 
Decern -f- Cornu -|- Servus — Nervus -4- Lac — C = AGRICOLA 

Answers to Math Problems — Page 63 

1. 20 pounds; 10 pounds, and 10 pounds for half its own weight. 

2. 99 +_9_ 

9 

3. Ten. About 99 persons out of 100 would say five trains, as a matter 
of course. The fact is overlooked that every day during the journey a 
fresh train is starting from the other end, while there are five trains on 
the way to begin with. Consequently the traveler will not meet five 
but ten. 

4. One does not know, because it is evident that he will not have the 
ball the entire game. 

5. Sixteen days. It is perhaps unnecessary to point out that the snail 
would gain one foot a day for fifteen days, and on the sixteenth day reach 
the top of the pole, and there remain. 

6. 35 and 15. 



The puzzler. The plank was to be 
cut as shown in the illustration. 



*' 



KEY TO BABY PICTURES — Page .35 



■ I 

m 



Louise Gavoni 
Maureen Cortelli 
Leonora Silva 
Richard Tassinari 
Allan Minelli 
Richard Darsch 
Judith Jackson 
Dorothy MacDonald 
Elizabeth Lopresti 
Barbara Mentzel 



6. Patricia Potter 

7. Gloria Correa 

8. Rita Gavoni 

9. Patricia Willette 

10. Geraldine DiStaula 

11. Charles Fillebrown 

12. Beverly Carton 

13. Sylvia Corsini 

14. Leon Scagliarini 

15. William Drew 

16. Carlyn Cavicchi 



74 



17. Nancy Merritt 

18. Edward Travers 

19. Maryellen Gault 

20. Janet Meehan 

21. Shirley Knight 

22. Robert Gordon 

23. Wilfred Doyon 

24. Joan Vandini 

25. Jane Clough 

26. Raymond Besegai 



THE NEW and THE OLD 



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Plymouth Savings Bank as remodeled in 1950 




Plymouth Savings Bank as originally built in 1887 



Plymouth Federal 



Savings and Loan Association 



Incorporated 1882 



Federalized 1937 



James R. Chandler 
President 



Robert J. Tubbs 
Vice-President — Treasurer 



Walder J. Engstrom 
Secretary and Assistant Treasurer 

2-583 




You will find a lot of 
future happiness in an 
insured savings account 




44 Main Street 



Call or Write for Information 

Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Tel. 324 






Best wishes to the 
Qraduating Class of 

1950 



G V> 




6 - 8 Court St. 



BK 



Compliments of 



MR. & MRS. ELLIS D. ATWOOD 




Best Wishes to Class of '50 

BAILEY MOTOR SALES, Inc. 

Telephone 1090 
BUICK and PONTIAC SALES and SERVICE 



-n- 



114 Sandwich Street 



Plymouth, Mass. 



PETROLEUM SALES AND SERVICE INC. 

Agents for 

THE ATLANTIC REFINING CO. 

Filtered Range and Fuel Oils White Flash Gasoline 
Atlantic High Film Strength Motor Oils 

Hedge Road Plymouth 

Telephone Plymouth 1499 


Hardware Plumbing 

JOHN E. JORDAN CO. 

Plymouth, Massachusetts 
Tel. 283 

Heating Sporting Goods 


Compliments of 

EGAN CHEVROLET CO. 

120 Sandwich St. 
PLYMOUTH 

PARTS • SALES • SERVICE 


PLYMOUTH SUPPLY CO. 

PLUMBING & HEATING 

Paint and Hardware Supplies 

Tel. 1423 39 Court St. 

Plymouth, Mass. 


"That Distinctive Store of Plymouth" 

GEORGE V. BUTTNER 
STORE 

Plymouth's Most Modern Store 

For Ladies, Misses and Children 

Tel. 290 19-21 Court St. 

PLYMOUTH 



Hunt: 



BEST WISHES 

to 

THE CLASS OF 1950 

EDES MANUFACTURING 
COMPANY 

Plymouth, Mass. 


To The Class of 1950 

Very Best Wishes 

for A 
Successful Future 

OLD COLONY 

and PLYMOUTH 

THEATRES 


DEXTER'S SHOE STORE 

Footwear for 

THE ENTIRE FAMILY 

Tel. 165-W 16 Court St. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

A. K. FINNEY 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

PLYMOUTH & BROCKTON 
ST. RAILWAY CO. 

109 Sandwich St. Plymouth 
TEL. 378 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

STAN-WAY SERVICE STATION 


Best Wishes to The Class of 1950 

PLYMOUTH ROCK HOTEL 

Good Food Moderate Prices 


PLYMOUTH ItOCK GROCERY 

Phone 1198 117 Sandwich Street 

Free Delivery 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

WARD & BRADY 

SIGNS 


COMPLIMENTS OF 

DUNLAP'S SERVICE STATION 

H. H. Raymond, Proprietor 



Nook Farm Dairy 



aii or nv 

PUPILS ABf 
AILK-WI9C 



Vr-e 




MILK 



and 



CREAM 



HEALTH BUILDER 



LOCAL MILK 



Nook Road 



Plymouth 



Telephone PLYMOUTH 1261 



Television 


ELMER E. AVERY 


Electric Appliances 


Insurance, Inc. 


Home & Auto Supplies 


7 Town Sq. Plymouth 166-W 


Volta Home & Auto Supply 
35 Main St. 


112 Water St. Boston, Laf. 3-2566 

"Serving the Public 
since 1904" 


Tel. 840 525 


Complete Real Estate Service 


PLYMOUTH MEN'S SHOP 

Wm. R. Cavicchi 


Compliments of 


• Manhattan Shirts 


J. W. BRENNER & SON 


• Leopold Morse Clothes 


Wallpaper — Paints 


• Gramery Park Clothes 


Artists' Supplies 


• Adams & Mallory Hats 

• Hole Proof Hose 


8 Samoset St. Tel. Ply. 1132 



COMPLIMENTS OF 




FIVE CENTS 
SAVINGS BANK 

/MCOAPO* AT£t> /S5S 

PLYMOUTH MASSACHUSETTS 



ZANELLO FURNITURE CO. 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


Tel. 1485 85 Court St. 


REGINALD MAROIS 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


MITCHELL THOMAS 


PRINCE ST. SERVICE STATION 


Inc. 


Corner of Court and Prince Sts. 


Furniture — Wallpaper — Paints 


Henry Stefani, Prop. 


66 Court St Plymouth 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


ELIZABETH M. FOSTER 




BEAUTY SHOP 


LOUIS KNIFE 


Room 10 Buttner Bldg. 




PLYMOUTH 


HATCH ELECTRIC CO. 


BROWN & CLARK 


12 Market St. 
Plymouth, Mass. 


Mfg. of Ruffled & Tailored Curtains 


BEST WISHES 




TO THE CLASS OF '50 


C. PAUL 




52 Court St. 


THE YARN SHOP 








Special Sale on Waltham 

17 Jewel Ladies' and Gents' Watches 
$29.75 up. Tax included. 


PILGRIM DRUG 




J*r> Ql. ..iA r .j. n cv ^ 


Also we carry fine Hamilton watches. 
We repair watches in 5 days. 

E. BOTIERI, Jeweler 
290 Court St. No. Plymouth, Mass. 




.^,5 toaltyijuiK Gxyvwy Ml 








COMPLIMENTS 
OF 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


JIM'S RESTAURANT 


SEARS FUEL 




COMPANY 


COMPLIMENTS OF 


COMPLIMENTS 


PLYMOUTH SHOE HOSPITAL 


OF 


63K Main Street 
PLYMOUTH. MASS. 


CAPPANNARI BROS. 



wtf 



PLYMOUTH ROCK 
HARDWARE CO. 

Telephone 950 
62 Court St. Plymouth 


THE ROGERS PRINT 

Complete Printing Service 

20 Middle St. Tel. 165-M 
Plymouth, Mass. 


ARONS FURNITURE CO. 

R 18 Middle St. Tel. Ply. 25 

Every - Thing - For 
N The - Home 
S 


THE HOBSHOLE HOUSE 

An Inn With An Early American Charm 

212 Sandwich St. Tel. 1153-W 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis J. O'Neill 


H. A. BRADFORD 

Distributor for 

S. S. PIERCE 
Specialties 

1 Warren Ave. Plymouth 
Telephone 1298-W 


Plymouth Rock Joint Board 

Textile Workers Union 
of America, C.I.O. 

317 Court St., N. Plymouth, Mass. 

Theodore Filteau, Manager 


Compliments 
of 

BARBIERFS MARKET 
Jabez Corner Tel. 253 

• 

Quality Meats & Groceries 


PLYMOUTH ROCK 
CLEANERS 

"The Place with Parking Space" 

Water St. - Opp. State Pier 
Phone 1744 

JACK OTTTNO -- ALFRED VOLTA 



HENRY MENGOLI & SON 



Plumbing and Heating Contractors 



AIR-CONDITIONING 



DELCO OIL BURNERS 



cJhe y^lymouth I iattonal {Joank 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 




CHECKING ACCOUNTS 

Commercial Personal "Checkmaster" 

BUSINESS and PERSONAL LOANS 

TRUST DEPARTMENT 

American Express Travellers Checks 




SADpW'S 

/oshion (en! 



er 

-D- -D- -D- 

Shows the Newest in Misses', Women's and Children's Wear 



Compliments 
of 

PlOPPI'S GRILL 



Compliments 
of 






SCUDDER COAL & OIL CO. 



Compliments of 

MORSE & SHERMAN 

WM. J. SHARKEY 
Court Street Plymouth 


(^ooamg s 

Jewelers 

Established 1802 

DIAMONDS WATCHES JEWELRY 

Sterling Silver, Electrical Appliances 

Clocks, and Gifts 

EXPERT CLOCK and WATCH REPAIRING 

Telephone 429 18 Court Street 

PLYMOUTH 


Compliments of 

TAVERNELLI'S BARBER SHOP 

Soares and Ottani, Proprietors 


PIONEER FOOD STORE 

40 Court St. 


Compliments of 

OLD COLONY LAUNDRY 

of Plymouth 

Master Launderers — Dry Cleaners 
18 Howland St. 


Best Wishes to Class of 1950 
THOMAS R. HOGAN 


WILFRED DOYON 

"Electrician" 
Stafford Street Plymouth, Mass. 


Compliments of 
BILLY WALSH'S MARKET 

54 Court St. Tel. 1259 


Compliments of 
JAY'S ARMY & NAVY STORE 

42 Main St. Ext. 
Plymouth Tel. 337-W 


HENRY'S FURNITURE CO. 

Henry Busi, Prop. 

• Westinghouse 

• Radio Appliances 
Linoleum - Asphalt - Rubber Tile 

40 Court St. Tel. 1118 Plymouth 



SHIRETOWN MOTORS INC. 



Sales 



iSSra£ 



Service 



Water Street 



Phone 1407 



Plymouth 



Plymouth, Mass. 



Compliments of 

Pepsi - Cola 

Kist Beverages 

and 
O-So Grape 



Tel. 863 



Compliments of 



M & M SPORTING GOODS CO. 



Tel. 1915 



25 Main St. 



BEST WISHES 
SENIORS 



25 Main St. 



ART JEWELRY CO. 



Plymouth, Mass. 



PURITAN CLOTHING CO. 

"The Men's and Boys' Store of Plymouth" 
1 — 1 


LJ 

PURITAN TAILORING DEPT. 

TAILORS — CLEANERS — FURRIERS 


COMPLIMENTS OF 
BUTTON MOTOR CAR CO. 

115 Sandwich Street 
PLYMOUTH 

OLDSMOBILE -•- CADILLAC 


LEADING SHOE STYLES 

For Dress, Casual or Sportwear" 

• 
HOSIERY — HANDBAGS 

All at Popular Prices 
CATERING TO TEEN-AGERS 


COOPER DRUG CO. 

Incorporated 
Prescriptions Carefully Compounded 

DRUGS — CANDY — CIGARS 
TOBACCO 

HENDRIES ICE CREAM 

(In Seven Flavors) 
In Drugs — If It's Rexall — It's Right 


NICKERSON OIL CO. 

RANGE and FUEL OIL 
Telephone 580-W 

234 Sandwich St. Plymouth 


Your Search for Furniture 

Is Not Complete 
Until You Have Shopped 

GOGGIN - JOHNSON 

11 Court Street 




PRINTERS and LITHOGRAPHERS 
_EYDEN PRESS 9 TOWN SQ - Plymouth, mass. 

"COMPLETE PRINTING — INCLUDING LAYOUT & FINISHED ART WORK' 



Printers of this Publication 



TEL. 775 







PLYMOUTH CORDAGE COMPANY 



PLYMOUTH, MASSACHUSETTS 



bv'y 



Compliments 


i of 


THE ARTHUR L. 


ELLIS CO. 


PLYMOUTH, 1 


\IASS. 


NEW YORK BOSTO> 


r CHICAGO 


IF YOU WANT GOOD 




FRAPPES STOP AT . . 


• 


MAYER'S 


CANDY STORE 


. Compliments of ^ 




Cape Insurance Agency 

Amedeo V. Sgarzi Orfeo H. Sgarzi 
Enrico Ferrari 


i«;m'i'w.-al 






ZST. 1919 

NEON SIGNS 


SALES . SERVICE - MAINTENANCE 

ERECTION 

LETTERING OF ALL KINPS 

TRUCK & AUTO SPRAYING 




INSURANCE 

for Everything Insurable 
4 Court St. Plymouth, Mass. 


IE. PLYMOUTH 33 


315 Court St. Plymouth 




Tel. 66 


Compliments 




KAY'S CUT-RATE 


of 




Lowest Prices 'in Town 

PATENT MEDICINES 


MALAGUTI BROS. 




COSMETICS 
Corner North St. 67 Main St. 



TOWN BROOK SERVICE STATION 


(fW$\ Mando's 


International Sales and Service 


. . . 24-Hour Road Service . . . 


14 Water Street Plymouth 820-W 


Telephone 825 P. O. Box 356 


BLISS HARDWARE CO. 


• Yale • Toridheet 


• Builders' Hardware • Oil Burners 


• Mechanics' Tools • Plumbing — Heating 


• Pittsburg Paints • Sheet Metal Work 


• Electrical Supplies • Furnaces — Boilers 


• Housewares • Locksmiths 




Best of Luck 


\0 lAAffsS 


To the Class of 1950 


o&^fr 


HOLMES GROCERY 


<^ — J cs 


87 Sandwich St. 


JEWELERS 
Keepsake Diamonds 




CAPEWAY SERVICE STATION 


Hamilton - Elgin - Longines 


GASOLINE /^ =!! \ LUBRICATION 


28 Main St. Plymouth 


OIL /(fiULFll ACCESSORIES 
118 SANDWICH StV^s*/ PLYMOUTH, MASS 




MAURICE ; EDDIE i BATES 


Compliments of 




PRIMO'S SERVICE STATION 


CLOUGH'S MARKET 


Primo Zucchelli 


Tel. 459 84 Summer St. 


Plymouth, Mass. 




GAMBINI'S 


Compliments of 


AIR-CONDITIONED 


PLYMOUTH BAKING CO. 


LUNCHEONETTE 
Tel. 372 52 Main St. 


Bread, Rolls, Doughnuts, 

Cake, Pies, and Cookies, 

Birthday Cakes 






Compliments of 

The North Plymouth 

Merchants Displaying 

This Seal 




PLYMOUTH LUMBER CO. 

BUILDING MATERIALS OF ALL KINDS 

Telephone 237 


THIS MARK 

DESIGNED * PRINTED 

JH^PRESS fJL 
ESTABLISHED 1*3* 

1 s your guarantee of . . . 
SATISFACTORY work by 

a 12 5 year old firm financ- 
ially strong with a record of 
Successful performance. 


'PlYANOUIH. MASS. ESKIMO 

"Fifty Years of Serving Plymouth" 

61 and 63 Main Street 


Compliments 
of 

a 

Friend 


BEST OF LUCK TO ALL 
FUTURE GRADUATES 

Class of 1950 



^M 



■■ 



In the long run ... 



You and your friends will prize the portrait 
that looks like you — your truest self, free 
from stage effects and little conceits. 

It is in this "long run" photography that 
PURDY success has been won. 

Portraiture by the camera that one cannot 
laugh at or cry over in later years. 

For present pleasure and future pride protect 
your photographic self by having PURDY 
make the portraits. 



• • 



PURDY 

160 TREMONT STREET, BOSTON 

Official Photographers to 
Plymouth High School Class 1950 



SPECIAL RATES TO P. H. S. STUDENTS 



-- AUTOGRAPHS — 




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